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Oct
11
revised Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
deleted 118 characters in body; edited title
Oct
11
asked Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
Oct
10
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
7
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
@GreenAsJade, It's not about the balancing, but about the change. It only appears to balance because the story utilizes the exact same characters (to keep reader's attention) instead of switching characters for each new use-case.
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
Up means positive and down means negative. The fable is saying that life has "no ups and downs" because what appears as up may be down and what appears as down may be up. In other words, the fable is saying that everything is equally up and equally down.
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
So what's the opposite of blessing in disguise? "misfortune in disguise"?
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
"Ups and downs" means a totally different thing than what the fable mean. See english.stackexchange.com/questions/199859/…
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
+1, this is much better than Shoe's answer
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
Not a good enough expression. It conveys less than 10% of the meaning conveyed by the actual fable sivers.org/horses
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— Life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
@Drew, That fable is not talking about "ups and downs". It's more about saying the downs are ups in the future and the ups are downs in the future, in other words, life has "no ups and downs". See sivers.org/horses for more info.
Oct
1
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
30
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
24
comment What are the distinctions between “authoritarian”, “totalitarian”, and “dictatorial”?
How does "monarchy" fit here? Isn't "monarchy" identical to "autocracy"?
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
24
comment Do you want choice A or B? Yes!— Is it wrong to answer with a yes when given two options?
It entirely depends on the context. And I was talking about written English, where punctuations exist in explicit forms. E.g. "Do you want (A or B)"? No.
Sep
24
comment 'Eo ipso' vs 'Ipso facto'
Is the usage of "praeter necessitatem" in the last sentence even grammatically valid?
Sep
24
comment Does “either A or B ” preclude “both A and B”?
@chaos, Your last paragraph is incorrect: The reason "yes" is a valid response is due to a shift in precedence; it is not due to having a part cancelled by context. "Yes" is an equally valid response to xor questions too, e.g. "Do you want A xor B?" "Yes, I want (A xor B).", which means I want either A or B but not both. Compare that to "Yes, I want (A or B)." which means I want either A or B or both.
Sep
24
comment Do you want choice A or B? Yes!— Is it wrong to answer with a yes when given two options?
Well, "No" can in many cases also mean rejecting only a single choice but not the other.
Sep
23
comment How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
@Robusto, Where will the tenses "I would eat", "I had been eaten", and "I have been eaten" fit in the diagram above?
Sep
18
awarded  Notable Question