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Oct
4
answered Word for a person that is both caring and cold-hearted logical
Oct
3
comment What is the reasoning for the idiom “in and of itself” having the meaning it has?
Hm, Webster doesn't list your second definition of "per se"... merriam-webster.com/dictionary/per%20se
Oct
3
comment What is the reasoning for the idiom “in and of itself” having the meaning it has?
@bye, Ic. Btw, why do you say the phrase mean the same thing as "X qua X"? "qua" is very different from "in and of itself", it has the same meaning as "in the role of" or "as". Merk's answer below elaborates on this point.
Oct
3
comment What is the reasoning for the idiom “in and of itself” having the meaning it has?
@TheRaven, Do you have any more contrasting examples besides the one you listed?
Oct
3
comment What is the name of a small unluxurious restaurant?
@DA., "mom and pop" is too broad because it can fit many things. It can also be used for restaurants that look nothing like those two pictures in the question.
Oct
3
revised Can “very” be combined with “non-”?
<n >s
Oct
3
comment What is the English equivalent to the Japanese word 学者バカ, “Scholar’s fool”?
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇, That's one definition, but also see the second definition. Regardless, the symbol "savant" definitely has a "disability" connotation, due to the second definition and also due to the term "savant syndrome". Also, no one actually says "idiot savant". It's rude and unacceptable to call someone with that condition an "idiot savant". Even "autistic savant" can be interpreted as rude. You would say "oh, so you're a savant" instead of "oh, so you're an idiot savant".
Oct
3
comment What's a word that means *something that facilitates something else*?
@FumbleFingers, Why is this question closed?
Oct
1
comment What is the reasoning for the idiom “in and of itself” having the meaning it has?
@bye, Also, "ruthfull", meaning?
Oct
1
comment What is the reasoning for the idiom “in and of itself” having the meaning it has?
"of itself" is rare enough, but "in itself" is pretty common. I've also heard "by itself"..
Oct
1
comment What is the etymology of “blackguard”? Does this British-sounding word have subtleties in its use?
@TimLymington,Wiktionary has both. Citation needed for your assertion.
Oct
1
comment What is the etymology of “blackguard”? Does this British-sounding word have subtleties in its use?
@Gilead, Any citations?
Sep
30
comment Word meaning “the act of intending to do nothing”
@BrianHooper, Ic. How did you come across a word like "floccinaucinihilipilification" anyway?
Sep
30
comment When should I use “Would”, “Would have”, “Will”, and “Will have”?
So, "would" is more polite for this reason?
Sep
30
comment Word meaning “the act of intending to do nothing”
@Brian, How would "floccinaucinihilipilification" has got anything to do with "inactivity"?
Sep
30
comment Word meaning “the act of intending to do nothing”
@mplungjan, "slack" alone is fine too. The Webster link above clearly states "intransitive verb, to shirk or evade work or duty, to be or become slack [wanting in activity, characterized by slowness, sluggishness, or lack of energy]". Oxford has it at "work slowly or lazily" with the noun form being "A spell of inactivity or laziness".
Sep
30
comment “Personified” in an OED definition
@phenry, Hmm, a screenshot would be very useful in clarifying the question....
Sep
29
revised How is the word “qua” used?
<noise >signal
Sep
29
comment How is the word “qua” used?
@Noldorin, So John Dewey wasn't in the real world? "Reification, qua pathology of abstraction, results in disease symptoms such as universalized, narrowed, and/or ontologized abstractions"
Sep
28
comment What is it called when you write what someone is saying?
@WS2, "dictation" can be used pretty loosely, "wrote my first poem at the age of four or five, my mother taking it down to dictation".