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21h
comment A single word meaning to abide in a place for a long time
@nicholas, I'm rotting here.
21h
comment People can ‘abide by’ the law, but can the law ‘abide people’?
Shouldn't there be a by after "abide" in "some citizens the law can abide"?
May
20
comment What's the origin of the idiom “to cut your teeth on something”?
@FumbleFingers, It has always been "cut his teeth". Indeed, "cut his cloth" doesn't even seem to appear much on Google. Where do you come from?
May
19
awarded  Famous Question
May
17
awarded  Popular Question
May
17
comment When should I use an em-dash, an en-dash, and a hyphen?
@WalterTross, Meaning?
May
7
awarded  Yearling
May
4
comment What does “wrt” mean?
@Martha, Isn't it with "regards" to?
May
1
comment Meaning and origin of “if you catch my drift”
@JoeBlow, How did you get the idea that it's mainly used for gossip only? [citation needed].
May
1
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
25
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@user21497, Weird, couldn't find that quote. Where did you get it from?
Apr
25
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@this.lau_, "reinventing" can be used to mean a good thing. Like "reinventing email".
Apr
25
comment Does “reinventing the wheel” have negative or positive connotation?
@SF., Isn't "A week spent in the laboratory can save you from good two hours of visit to the library." upside-down?
Apr
24
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
23
comment “click on the image” vs. “click the image”
The reasoning sounds good, Buuuuuuuuuut Merriam Webster lists it as a transitive verb. Same goes for other "major" dictionaries. What gives? Is rogermue (below) on the right track?
Apr
18
comment Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?
It's not a weasel-word when the circumstances have been clearly stated. It's only a weasel-word when the circumstances are vague or not mentioned at all.
Apr
18
comment Does “is potentially faster” imply “is not slower”?
Since the "someone" in the question is referring to me, I'd thought I'd chipped in: Yes, the first point would be accurate, re: "In some circumstances we know about (for example, in the circumstance that the code is optimized for both X and Y), X is faster. In other circumstances we know about, it is the same speed, or slower."
Apr
15
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
11
comment What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
@FumbleFingers, I don't quite get you since I've already said that in the previous comment: There seems to be usages in computational linguistics, so the distinction is important in some ways.
Apr
11
revised What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
deleted 122 characters in body; edited title