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Jan
30
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
30
comment What is the origin of “hissy fit”?
@ghorahn, So that's how you got to this page?
Jan
26
comment What's the difference between 'every time' and 'everytime'?
@deadrat, I think "everytime" has become an acceptable alternate spelling for "every time".
Jan
26
comment Is the game, “go,” a proper noun? What about “checkers” or “chess”?
@JonPurdy, Well, italics doesn't exist only until relatively recently... so capitalization is the only way.
Jan
26
comment Is the game, “go,” a proper noun? What about “checkers” or “chess”?
@NickT, That's called avoiding the question.....
Jan
21
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
14
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
11
comment What does “proverbial” mean?
Hmm, but what if there are so many proverbs relating to that noun? E.g. what does "proverbial sleeves" mean?
Jan
5
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
5
comment Word for a person that is both caring and cold-hearted logical
@TimRomano, Cmon folks, it's just a description.
Jan
5
revised Word for a person that is both caring and cold-hearted logical
added 11 characters in body
Jan
5
comment Why did “sceptical” become “skeptical” in the US?
@Thursagen, Why do you write "her first dictionary"?
Jan
1
comment Madam vs. Ma'am
@simchona, Images down....
Dec
28
comment Single word that means “to look down on others”?
@user13267, The word you're looking for is "snob".
Dec
28
comment Term for disrespecting people with lower social condition
@TimPost, The word "elitist" sounds way too elite. "Snob" is much much more apt. (Contrast "I'm a elitist and nothing's wrong with it! " vs "I'm a snob and nothing's wrong with it! ")
Dec
22
answered What is a good word for “best example”?
Dec
10
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
8
comment “Answerer” and “asker”
Also see english.stackexchange.com/q/60179/8278
Dec
8
comment Should I prefer “asker” or “questioner” for a person who asked a question?
@tchrist, Why not OP?
Dec
8
comment Should I prefer “asker” or “questioner” for a person who asked a question?
There's a reason why "OP" was invented. Because both "questioner" and "asker" sounds odd.