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location Singapore
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seen Oct 23 at 16:54

I've a knack for pondering.





Autodidact of various trades, geek of several.                                        #13 in SO/SG


Oct
26
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
23
comment Is “what’s” a correct short form of “what does”?
@Jez, Quaint? What's so quaint about reducing "what does it mean" to "what's it mean"?
Oct
23
comment Is “what’s” a correct short form of “what does”?
@user43497, It's more likely to be a "does" in his sentence....
Oct
18
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
14
comment What does “non-normative” mean in this context?
@ColinFine, Wow, this duplicate has more upvotes then my original.
Oct
14
revised Meaning of “non-normative”?
deleted 21 characters in body; edited tags; edited title
Oct
14
comment Meaning of 'cf.'
Do you have some sources claiming "in practice cf means 'see also'"? Isn't 'see also' the usage of qv.?
Oct
11
revised Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
edited body; edited title
Oct
11
comment Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
So in other words "posterior" is just another word for "back" isn't it?
Oct
11
accepted Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
Oct
11
comment Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
Does the phrase "the posterior of my body" refer to the entire "back part" of the body including the heels, the calfs, the backside, the back, and the back of the neck, and the back of the head? Or does it only refer to the back of my torso?
Oct
11
revised Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
deleted 118 characters in body; edited title
Oct
11
asked Word for “the entire back part of the body”?
Oct
10
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
7
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— The life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
@GreenAsJade, It's not about the balancing, but about the change. It only appears to balance because the story utilizes the exact same characters (to keep reader's attention) instead of switching characters for each new use-case.
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— The life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
Up means positive and down means negative. The fable is saying that life has "no ups and downs" because what appears as up may be down and what appears as down may be up. In other words, the fable is saying that everything is equally up and equally down.
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— The life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
So what's the opposite of blessing in disguise? "misfortune in disguise"?
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— The life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
"Ups and downs" means a totally different thing than what the fable mean. See english.stackexchange.com/questions/199859/…
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— The life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
+1, this is much better than Shoe's answer
Oct
5
comment What is the English equivalent to the Chinese/Japanese saying, “塞翁失馬— The life is like Old Sai’s horse”?
Not a good enough expression. It conveys less than 10% of the meaning conveyed by the actual fable sivers.org/horses