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Nov
30
comment what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”?
@TimLymington I did misunderstand about mods. Even so, when I invest the time to form a question, I expect, at the least, to not get an answer. Receiving insults? I'll leave this account open because I asked a few questions with answers. I'll create a new account just for software dev. I adore English and Japanese grammar, but it distracts me from my real job. This turned out well in the end.
Nov
30
comment what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”?
@TimLymington Can you please be my proxy on the Council of Moderators and file a grievance that a mod is working to create an environment that dissuades participation? Then, just delete my user account on "English Language & Usage" forum. I don't need the abuse. :-)
Nov
30
comment what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”?
@TimLymington this is not a "homework question". i'm just trying to help a friend who is being taught incorrect english by very expensive english instructors in japan. me, personally, i am pretty content with my english skills. rather, i am just a tiny worried that my explanation is inadequate. and, i cared enough to ask for some assistance. as a mod has dinged this, well, i learned something much different on english stackexchange.
Nov
30
revised what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”?
Revision to a question that was flagged as "duplicate".
Nov
30
comment what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”?
@Centaurus While I think the subject probably is "1" (singular) "in 5 students" messes things-up. It might be possible that the subject is "students" (plural) and "1 in 5" just modifies the plural subject? How can the prepositional object be explained?
Nov
30
asked what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”?
Sep
30
accepted “to vest” vs. “to invest (as a metaphor)”
Sep
30
comment “to vest” vs. “to invest (as a metaphor)”
So, why is the "to vest" metaphor wrong? Imagine I own a construction company. I say, "Theresa, I want you to build a bridge. We will call it the 'Theresa's Awesome Bridge'." Doesn't that make you more vested in the building of the bridge. People know you managed the building of it, so a poorly built bridge will ruin your career. You own the success or failure of the bridge.
Sep
30
awarded  Curious
Sep
29
revised “to vest” vs. “to invest (as a metaphor)”
added 3 characters in body
Sep
29
asked “to vest” vs. “to invest (as a metaphor)”
Aug
23
comment “The feds” has a negative connotation? Who exactly are they anyway?
@Drew Rather than that being my belief, I tried to say that the title, "the feds", evokes such disdain in most Americans. Anyway... here is yet another example of the media using?/misusing? "the feds". This drives me crazy: mercurynews.com/business/ci_26389450/…
Aug
22
comment “The feds” has a negative connotation? Who exactly are they anyway?
@Drew wait. wait. I don't follow politics. I have no personal opinion about the connotation of "the feds". Any time I hear/read terms such as "the feds", "the Hill", "throw under the bus", "raise eyebrows", "talking heads", etc. I go do something else. The lexicon used to discuss American politics is so tedious, I refuse to listen. :-)
Aug
22
accepted “The feds” has a negative connotation? Who exactly are they anyway?
Aug
21
comment “The feds” has a negative connotation? Who exactly are they anyway?
@Drew An ex. is when the locals do the hard work, build a criminal case, and then "the feds" swoop in, "make a federal case out of it", and take all the credit. Another issue is that "the feds" are more creatures of patronage (ex: Monica Goodling scandal). Locals really keep the wheels of justice turning. The context I sense for "the feds" usage is that when locals have things under control, then several black SUVs arrive, and the refrain is "Oh, great, how wonderful. The feds are here... (roll eyes)".
Aug
21
asked “The feds” has a negative connotation? Who exactly are they anyway?
Aug
5
awarded  Critic
Aug
5
revised Ambiguous transitive verb whose meaning is determined by its subject
added 4 characters in body
Aug
5
comment Ambiguous transitive verb whose meaning is determined by its subject
transitive verbs?
Aug
5
answered Ambiguous transitive verb whose meaning is determined by its subject