20,010 reputation
23365
bio website
location Hampshire, United Kingdom
age 49
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 6 hours ago

I live in Lymington, Hampshire, and work in the Law Courts, which may have made my English slightly pedantic. I realize that Americans and other ex-colonials labour under a disadvantage, and regard it as an holy duty to assist them in speaking (and thinking) clearly.

"I don't have my references with me as I write, chiefly because you look so damn silly hauling a bookcase into a pub." Flann O'Brien, Irish Times column.


10h
comment What is the term for a Monarchy with only a King or a Queen, but not both?
Your edit has actually made things worse. Are you looking for the term for a system that has one ruler, either a king or a queen? That's what the title asks, and the answer is Monarchy. Or are you asking about a hypothetical (and unworkable) system that requires a king and a queen, equal in power, at all times? If so, there is no normal term, though various possibilties could be used.
10h
answered What is the term for a Monarchy with only a King or a Queen, but not both?
1d
answered Boolean OR in English
1d
reviewed Looks Good Remind me of the word that fits this 'concept'
1d
comment Use of preposition “with” after the word “marry”
Is there any source or support for these peculiar claims? (And Jhon is not an English name).
2d
comment What would you call size that fits between small and medium?
"No'-as-big-as-Medium-but-bigger-than-Small" (as Terry Pratchett's Pictsies would say)?
2d
comment Does the etymology of the word “government” mean “to control the mind”?
Even by your own twisted logic, -ment does not go back to ancient Greek. See if your Latin dictionary differentiates between mens and mentum.
2d
comment Is “paraphrased” the correct way to express an attributed quote with known origins?
I would like your answer better as a comment, and your comment better as an answer (though you might make clear that 'Paraphrase of Horace's Odes' is the actual title.)
Apr
13
comment The behavior that sell goods and service daily basis and collect payment monthly
This would probably be better on ell.stackexchange.com .
Apr
12
comment What term means “one who enjoys learning”?
I seem to recall the term 'swot'.
Apr
12
comment Americans can eat Chinese, but Chinese can't eat Americans?
@EdwinAshworth; Hmm, see your point. It is certainly possible [though pretentious], to eat a la chinoise, which is adverbial, and seems to be the same construction.
Apr
12
comment Americans can eat Chinese, but Chinese can't eat Americans?
As you implicitly recognise, Chinese is a noun in the second clause, but an adjective in the first. There is nothing to stop the Chinese eating American (assuming they like McDonald's).
Apr
10
reviewed Looks Good Better way of saying “Go-to man”?
Apr
9
comment Payable to the order of you or Payable to your order
+1 for the explanation, but yourself would also be more idiomatic in the last one.
Apr
7
revised Derogative vs Offensive
Derogative for derogatory is purely American.
Apr
7
comment Derogative vs Offensive
Only in AmE (which is why I have retagged it): the OED has 'tending to derogation' (a technical/legal term) as the only definition.
Apr
7
comment Derogative vs Offensive
Did you mean derogatory?
Apr
7
comment Where is the term clockwork used?
I agree; personally, I would only use wind-up toy to mean something like a cotton reel with an elastic band.
Apr
7
comment Speak of the Devil
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about cultural differences (or possibly a misunderstanding).
Apr
6
comment Common terminology for “blessing” and “curse”?
"Naming, including naming programming variables/classes" is specifically off-topic according to the faq. There's an interesting question at the bottom of this though; you might like to edit it to ask about human English.