431 reputation
27
bio website matthamilton.net
location Albury, Australia
age 41
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Jul 29 '13 at 7:46

Follow me on Twitter!

Check out my hobby projects:

Comicster
A free, open-source WPF application to manage your comic-book collection.
Halfwit
A minimalist, open-source, WPF Twitter client.
Budgie
A simple, asynchronous Twitter library for .NET 4 and up.
MadProps.AppArgs
A library to parse command-line or ClickOnce-URI arguments into an instance of a class.
MadProps.MvvmLight
A contrib project to add co-routine support to the MVVM Light Toolkit.


Feel free to contact me directly (mabster -at- madprops.org).

@mabster

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Aug
5
awarded  Yearling
Dec
28
comment Opposite of acronym
@nohat By that logic, M-W should be defining "your" and "you're" as synonyms (based on common usage). ;)
Dec
28
comment Opposite of acronym
@Gnawme Don't get me wrong - I was agreeing with you. I was just pointing out that those commenters who are using MW as a reference to argue that constructs like "U.N." are acronyms might need to find another source.
Dec
27
comment Opposite of acronym
I was always taught that acronyms are words formed from initials, and MW is the only source that I've ever seen that doesn't define them that way.
Aug
6
awarded  Yearling
Apr
29
awarded  Commentator
Feb
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
9
awarded  Precognitive
Nov
16
comment Is it offensive to call a redhead a “ginger”?
In Australia the term "ranga" is becoming more and more common. Short for "orangutan", I think it might be a wee bit more offensive than "ginger". :)
Nov
3
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Sep
4
comment How do you pluralize abbreviations of metric names (e.g. “kilo”)?
I've seen "kilos" used for kilograms, but that's all. I've never seen "mega" or "nano" used as an abbreviation for any measurement.
Aug
24
comment When did “while” and “whilst” become interchangeable?
Perhaps I was wrong about it removing the ambiguity, because the second example is supposed to mean the opposite: "I don't often whistle while I walk."
Aug
18
comment Words for meat differ from the words for the corresponding animal
Melvyn Bragg talked about this in his excellent "Adventure of English" TV series (and presumably also in the book). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Adventure_of_English
Aug
17
comment Microsoft Word's “fragments”
@Shinto I'd still like to see a broader context for using "Things of this sort" as a sentence. Can you update your question?
Aug
17
comment Microsoft Word's “fragments”
I suppose it depends on the type of document you're writing. If I were writing something more formal than an answer on a forum, I wouldn't want to include any sentence fragments, and would rewrite the first sentence as, "Neither of the sentences listed above make any sense on their own."
Aug
17
answered Microsoft Word's “fragments”
Aug
16
comment Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms?
+1 (more if I could) for expaining that acronyms are pronounced as words. You'd be surprised how many people don't know that (and actually argue that it's not true).
Aug
13
answered What is the best way to explain how to choose between “its” and “it's”?
Aug
6
answered How much punctuation is appropriate when ending a sentence with a full-sentence quotation?
Aug
5
awarded  Teacher