154 reputation
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location Charlotte, NC
age 31
visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Nov 15 '13 at 13:13

Feb
20
comment Adjective that means “disableable”?
@Candide: If this question is about software development, please edit the question to indicate that. Terms like "enable" and "disable" are idiomatic to software development, so any alternatives need to be presented in that context rather than that of general language.
Feb
20
comment Adjective that means “disableable”?
@FumbleFingers: Absolutely. I agree that your answer, given the question as stated, is a good one (FWIW, I upvoted). I just don't think it's a good one to what the OP's really asking, and the question should be edited to indicate that.
Feb
20
comment Adjective that means “disableable”?
Context is key here; it sounds as if @Candide is creating a software component, where the term "disable" is idiomatic; "defeat" is not.
Nov
22
comment Euphemism for “There's more than one way to skin a cat”
Who shines their pennies?
Sep
6
comment “Can’t help but” vs. “can help but”
@Marthaª: They might, but I would expect them all to say something like "I can help, but I think this is a difficult question".
Sep
2
comment Can I precede a noun with more than one determiner?
Note that "both of them" would not be a replacement of just "both the", it would replace "both the cats" (Your example demonstrates that, but the first paragraph does not). While some people might say "both of them cats", it would be considered poor english.
Aug
26
comment what does “Not Hannah Samuel more” mean?
+1; this is the only way to read that sentence (in context) that makes any sense.
May
1
comment Difference between “she cut her hair” and “she cut her hair off”?
If we want to get really pedantic, then it actually means she's cut off four fingers, as the thumb is considered a digit but not a finger. ;)
May
1
comment What's a good phrase for “refining a process which is hopelessly broken”?
@Shyam: Not all offices are the same.
Apr
20
comment What is the adverb for 'seasoned'?
You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
Apr
17
comment “1 in 10 are” or “1 in 10 is”?
@fluffy: At the risk of sounding snarky, it's different because you've selected different words. Language and grammar quite often differ in cases where different words are used...
Apr
17
comment “1 in 10 are” or “1 in 10 is”?
I'm sorry, I'm really not seeing this. "in ten children" is a prepositional phrase. "Children" is the object of the preposition. "One" is the subject. "One" is, rather obviously, singular. What am I missing here...?
Mar
5
comment Does “woman driver” have a special meaning other than female driver?
Is it really possible to "toot" aggressively?
Dec
5
comment Are there any words I can use to disambiguate “biweekly”?
@jimbob: I disagree that the majority of Americans will know what a fortnight is. I think the majority will have no idea what it is and will think it's something from the opening sentence of the Gettysburg Address.
Dec
5
comment Are there any words I can use to disambiguate “biweekly”?
@JonPurdy: Because the people doing the meeting haven't already killed themselves.
Nov
29
comment “Highest building of/in the world”
"He was the most valuable player on the team." I don't believe I've ever heard "in the team" used by a native speaker.
Nov
27
comment “Is there something wrong?” or “Is there anything wrong?”
+1 to @TerryLiYifeng; I might likewise say "Something is wrong," meaning that I've used "something" in a negative sense. "Anything is wrong" wouldn't even make sense.
Nov
27
comment “Highest building of/in the world”
Actually, I'd argue that "on" is more common with the word "team", rather than "in".
Nov
27
comment “Highest building of/in the world”
+1 to this answer and to @Mr.ShinyandNew安宇. There's a difference between being grammatically correct and being idiomatic; saying "of the word" will likely sound strange to a native speaker, though there's nothing grammatically wrong with it.
Nov
23
comment Can “thanks in advance” be considered rude?
Or even eternally grateful!