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age 41
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Sep 16 '11 at 21:17

Nov
26
comment “Whereäs” as an alternative spelling of “whereas”
Last I checked, the only place I see this consistently is in the New Yorker.
Nov
26
comment Repeating the consonant in many words in a sentence or phrase
What did they have in mind?
Aug
21
comment Why are there two pronunciations for “either”?
@Steve: That was just my way of pointing out that "there" was misspelled in the original title. :)
Aug
21
comment Why do you say “friend of mine” instead of “friend of me”?
That's not genitive case...
Aug
21
comment Why do you say “friend of mine” instead of “friend of me”?
Thanks for your feedback, though.
Aug
21
comment Why do you say “friend of mine” instead of “friend of me”?
The problem here is the article. So, for instance, you can say "This daughter of mine..." and it sounds fine whether she is your only daughter or not.
Aug
21
comment Why do you say “friend of mine” instead of “friend of me”?
I don't think I originally said that there is one form for all prepositional phrases, or even the same homophonic preposition. If I did say that, I was wrong.
Aug
21
comment Why do you say “friend of mine” instead of “friend of me”?
No, I think this is wrong too. "of mine" doesn't mean the person is one of a group. "My" and "mine" are the same words in different cases. "My" is the nominative form.
Aug
21
comment What mnemonics help solve common linguistic issues?
I think that's not what most linguists would consider a "linguistic issue", as it's just about spelling.
Aug
21
comment Did eBay take the name from a Pig Latin word?
That's interesting. I always assumed that the company was based on the SF bay area, and that it was from "e", a common shortening of electronic which was popular at the time on analogy with "email", and "bay", referring to the area it was (I assumed) first deployed in.
Aug
21
comment “Fill out a form” or “fill in a form”
Well, if you consider American English less acceptable than British English, then I guess they are not both equally acceptable. That's up to you and your audience.
Aug
20
comment Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb
I agree, you don't "solve" paradigms. Apparently you aren't saying what you want to say.
Aug
20
comment “Do it” versus “do that”
"Do" here is what you might call a proverb, it stands in for the verb in the antecedent clause. This is definitely a type of verb phrase ellipsis. I can recommend some reading for you if you doubt that.
Aug
20
comment “Do it” versus “do that”
Both of those sound awkward. I would normally say: "...it doesn't do so in this case."
Aug
19
comment Are collective nouns always plural, or are certain ones singular?
Yes, but if you take a look at that language log article, you'll see that it's not quite as clear cut as that. But basically, it's just a dialect difference.
Aug
18
comment Difference between “ability” and “capability”
But it does not follow that "capable" implies the lack of present ability. Rather that "able" does imply this, whereas "capable" does not. This is not the same thing as saying that "capable" actually means "not presently able".
Aug
18
comment Why is “ain't” not listed in dictionaries?
I don't understand this question. Which dictionary, exactly, doesn't define "ain't"?
Aug
18
comment Why is “ain't” not listed in dictionaries?
What I'm wondering is, what dictionary doesn't list ain't?
Aug
18
comment “Intents and purposes” versus “intensive purposes”
Both of these are stock expressions that don't mean much of anything anymore. That's probably one reason why people can use them interchangeably without noticing it.
Aug
17
comment When referring to a noun, when does the gender matter?
Yup, that's true.