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seen Sep 16 '11 at 21:17

Aug
6
comment Difference between “ability” and “capability”
From the OED entry for able, note the last word used in the definition: "b. In predicative use, with infinitive or without complement: having the means, capacity, or qualifications to do something; having sufficient power; in such a position that a particular action is possible; worthy, qualified, competent, capable."
Aug
6
answered Is it alright to use lowercase “i” or should you always use “I” (uppercase)?
Aug
6
revised When to use “that” and when to use “which”?
added 20 characters in body
Aug
6
comment When to use “that” and when to use “which”?
Ah yes, I wasn't specific enough there.
Aug
6
comment Difference between “ability” and “capability”
The etymology of a word does not necessarily have anything to do with its modern meaning. Again, saying that someone is capable of x does not imply that they cannot do x right now. That is simply false.
Aug
6
answered Difference between “ability” and “capability”
Aug
6
comment Difference between “ability” and “capability”
I disagree. "John is capable of reading" does not imply that John can't read at the moment.
Aug
5
answered When referring to a noun, when does the gender matter?
Aug
5
answered “May” & “Might”: What's the right context?
Aug
5
comment “May” & “Might”: What's the right context?
See comment above.
Aug
5
revised When to use “that” and when to use “which”?
added 76 characters in body
Aug
5
awarded  Editor
Aug
5
revised When to use “that” and when to use “which”?
added 2 characters in body; deleted 5 characters in body
Aug
5
comment Is it appropriate to use short form of “have” ('ve) when it means possession?
As demonstrated in your second sentence!
Aug
5
comment When is it appropriate to end a sentence in a preposition?
This rule has no basis. See several posts above for information.
Aug
5
awarded  Critic
Aug
5
awarded  Teacher
Aug
5
comment Can a word be contracted twice (e.g. “I'ven't”)?
Yes, nohat is right here.
Aug
5
comment Can a word be contracted twice (e.g. “I'ven't”)?
It is not true that contractions should be avoided in formal writing. I'd challenge anyone to find a decent, lengthy piece of formal writing which doesn't use contractions.
Aug
5
answered Is it acceptable to start a sentence with “however”?