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visits member for 4 years, 3 months
seen Sep 16 '11 at 21:17

Aug
9
answered When is it acceptable to use Internet abbreviations such as “u” or “r”?
Aug
9
answered Are there diagnostic tests to distinguish between proper and common nouns?
Aug
9
comment What alternative would you suggest to “in/with regard(s?) to”?
No, I think that's just wrong. You have to watch out, people love to make up "just so stories" about grammar. This arises in part from the very common misapprehension that all points of grammar make some kind of rational sense, when in fact a lot of the details are purely conventional. For instance, you can still say "In regard to the strawberries..." The plural there is just another (probably incoming) variant. If you don't want pedantic people to be irritated with you, then by all means don't use it.
Aug
9
answered “did shoot” vs “shot”
Aug
9
answered What alternative would you suggest to “in/with regard(s?) to”?
Aug
8
comment Recommendations for non-native English speaking bloggers
Your grammar is not exactly what people in the US, UK, Australia, etc., would consider correct, but it's understandable. Why not write as well as you can? There's nothing wrong with being a non-native speaker, and there's nothing wrong with writing in a non-standard dialect. If you are looking for something that will automatically make your writing standard, I don't believe there is anything that can do that.
Aug
8
comment Should you always use the accent in foreign words like “résumé”?
It's useful for distinguishing a noun from a verb? How about giving us an example where it would really be ambiguous.
Aug
8
comment Why do some people pedantically cling to dying word forms (e.g. die, oxen)?
I'm not saying this is necessarily a bad thing. It is what it is, and like I said everyone does this to some degree (that is, use the way they talk to lay claim to prestige of some kind -- same goes for kids who talk like rappers). When I give a lecture I certainly talk in a certain way, and if I didn't people would think it very strange.
Aug
7
revised Which is correct: “standing on line” or “standing in line”?
deleted 8 characters in body
Aug
7
comment Is the usage of “speaks to” new? Is it American?
You're missing definite articles in both of those examples, actually.
Aug
7
comment In what ways is Appalachian speech closer to Elizabethan English than contemporary British?
By "not completely true" I hope you mean "utterly false". :)
Aug
7
answered Which is correct: “standing on line” or “standing in line”?
Aug
7
comment Why do some people pedantically cling to dying word forms (e.g. die, oxen)?
I am pretty certain that even then you wouldn't see these effects. The P600, for instance, seems to be a signature of the brain trying to reanalyze a syntactic structure. This is a totally unconscious thing and it has to do with the mechanical workings of how the brain processes syntax, nothing to do with whether someone likes a given variant or not.
Aug
7
comment Favourite untranslatables
I agree with JSBangs. This is literally off topic, although it could perhaps be reframed to make it more pertinent.
Aug
7
answered Origin/reason for the expression “on the bus” instead of “in the bus”
Aug
7
answered Is it correct to say “on accident” instead of “by accident”?
Aug
7
comment Why do written English vowels differ from other Latin-based orthographies?
+1 You scooped me. :) Also, it might be useful to mention the northern cities chain shift as one modern example.
Aug
7
comment Why do some people pedantically cling to dying word forms (e.g. die, oxen)?
There's a ton of really interesting literature on this subject. If you'd like some recommendations, let me know.
Aug
7
answered When should I use “in” or “on”?
Aug
7
comment What are some of the better English reference grammars?
Have you taken a look at Pullum and Huddleston? If so, how would you say they compare? (I agree that any reference grammar which makes no use of corpora is far from ideal. I doubt that many serious (i.e., written by qualified linguists) modern reference grammars would fall into that category though.)