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seen Sep 16 '11 at 21:17

Aug
13
comment Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?
English is full of homophones which are different parts of speech. The fact that there is a verb that sounds like "rather" and an adverb that sounds like "rather" has nothing to do with whether either is correct.
Aug
13
comment Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?
Yes, pedantically speaking one should never leave words out. English teachers don't do it, and I don't [leave words out], either. It's terribly uncouth. :)
Aug
13
answered Can “real” be used as an adverb to describe an adjective?
Aug
13
comment Why are there two pronunciations for “either”?
More importantly, why are there three spellings for "there"?
Aug
13
comment Why are there two pronunciations for “either”?
Hey, if it was good enough for Beowulf, it's good enough for everyone!
Aug
13
comment Why am I always compelled to begin a response with “Well, ”?
This isn't true. When it comes to extremely subtle shades of meaning people have a tendency to wildly overstate (if not simply make up) meanings. People should consult the literature on discourse markers if they are curious about words like "well".
Aug
13
answered Why am I always compelled to begin a response with “Well, ”?
Aug
13
comment How can I practice differentiating between the “æ” and “ɛ” sounds in English phonology?
Honestly, I wouldn't worry too much about it. It's exceedingly rare for those learning a second language later in life to achieve native-like pronunciation. Yet people still get along just fine. Probably not worth the untold hours of practice it would require.
Aug
13
comment What is the difference between “’ll” and “will”?
Sure. If you want your prose to sound stilted and unnatural, by all means avoid contractions. :)
Aug
12
awarded  Beta
Aug
11
comment Why do some people pedantically cling to dying word forms (e.g. die, oxen)?
Are you saying that "feet" is just as uncommon as "die"?
Aug
11
answered Pronunciation of “especially”
Aug
11
comment What is the difference between “’ll” and “will”?
That's not true. Contractions are used in all kinds of writing, no matter how formal.
Aug
10
answered What are the differences between “assume”, “presume” and “suppose”
Aug
10
comment “did shoot” vs “shot”
I have spent a little time trying to look this up today, and have had no luck. So I'll just say that it seems to me that "do" here is providing something like contrastive focus in information structure terms. So in that sense it certainly has a function other than as a landing site for tense. If its primary function was to host tense, then it would not be optional, I think.
Aug
10
comment When is it acceptable to use Internet abbreviations such as “u” or “r”?
Incidentally, an actual linguistics site was proposed, but I seriously doubt it will ever get enough support to get off the ground.
Aug
10
comment When is it acceptable to use Internet abbreviations such as “u” or “r”?
In that case a usage site should probably never have been set up, because there is almost never a factually correct answer to these things in the sense that there would be for, say, engineering questions.
Aug
10
comment “did shoot” vs “shot”
I'm not sure I would agree that this should be considered a case of do-support. Do-support, as far as I understand it, is when "do" is inserted purely so you have something to apply tense to (hence, "support", it doesn't do much on its own). Here "do" does have a function of its own. This is probably splitting hairs though.
Aug
9
revised When is it acceptable to use Internet abbreviations such as “u” or “r”?
added 98 characters in body; added 7 characters in body
Aug
9
answered When is it acceptable to use Internet abbreviations such as “u” or “r”?