694 reputation
1514
bio website sites.google.com/site/…
location Toronto, Canada
age 44
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Nov 6 at 15:26

Canadian English speaker, with a penchant for reading fiction and non-fiction.


Aug
19
comment “My personal opinion is…” Is it always pointless to use the words “personal” and “personally”?
When I say "in my humble opinion" that's gentle self-mockery. My opinion is usually not humble, and I know it.
Jun
24
comment What's the grammatical object of “at” in “at 2-0 down”?
The omission of certain joining words is a common "tell" for a non-native English speaker. So, as the result is awkward, and inelegant, no, you can't leave it out in your original sentence. Your comment is different. In some situations, terse or abbreviated speech is common, such as when "live blogging", or sports color commentary. In spoken english, such terseness is awkward.
Jun
20
comment a person's interests do [blank]?
This is all too passive.
May
21
comment jungle town and sporting woman
It's literature, it's a character, it's a story. Do you imagine that stories and literature and characters inside them have a fixed definition for what these things mean? The meaning is found in the story or nowhere at all. Perhaps the author wants you to infer that Sporting means "a woman who was a flirt" or "a promiscuous woman", and it's all to be implied and inferred by characters and no real absolute meaning exists.
Apr
25
awarded  Yearling
Mar
16
comment Alternative ways to say “I cannot answer that question”?
+1 for not at liberty to say. Professional, crisp, good.
Mar
12
comment Word for a person who loses or has lost faith?
Heathen has too much baggage, and too many negative connotations to be an answer to this person's question. Also Heathen means "never was" not "formerly was". I do not think you can become a "heathen". I very much doubt anyone thinks of themselves as one, except in jest. It is an insult, which one can of course claim, but that is not widely done.
Oct
5
comment “Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?
Zerg flibble derp niffle wingo.
Oct
4
accepted “Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?
Oct
4
comment “Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?
It's accepted by the official Scrabble app on android. Which is weird because they use the scrabble trademark but obviously do not use the official scrabble dictionary.
Oct
4
revised “Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?
edited title
Oct
4
comment “Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?
Okay, it is in an online Scrabble dictionary for several Scrabble games including the Scrabble-brand game for Android, but is NOT valid as a regular table-boardgame Scrabble word? So then it's a "noise word" in certain things like Words With Friends ,and the official Android Scrabble (TM) app, but it has no english meaning.
Oct
4
asked “Prolers” is in no English dictionary and yet it's in several online Scrabble dictionaries. Is it an English word?
Sep
27
comment Why is “hysterical” applied to women but rarely to men?
I rarely hear it used at all, other than as "that was really really funny" (that was hysterical).
Aug
19
comment What word means centered about death?
Forcing your readers to go consult a dictionary could be either (a) a smart move, or (b) a really dumb move, depending on who your readers are. If it's an essay for your teacher, you might impress one teacher, and tick another one off, or rouse suspicions of plagiarism. If my 15 year old son wrote an essay with that word in it, I'd wonder where he got it from, since it makes the writer sound ultracrepidarian. (Yup, go look that one up.)
May
27
comment Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?
Talking through your hat, heard conversationally in Ontario Canada, and northern us states. Not heard thumb phrase.
May
25
comment Is ‘anything in a skirt” a popular idiom? Does it have special overtones?
@Mitch; Skirt actually was used in derogatory ways by condescending chauvinists, and although the memory may be fading for some, it would be wise to avoid it if you care how others see you.
May
25
comment How can I describe a person who does not get to the point?
Or a pompous windbag.
May
25
comment Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?
I haven't heard that phrase used in conversation for 20 years, but I have read it in novels, and heard it back in the 70s, 80s, and 90s.
Apr
25
awarded  Yearling