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seen Apr 9 at 19:19

My favorite data structure is the k-d tree.


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awarded  Popular Question
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comment Is there a rule concerning nouns with foreign articles?
Hilarious fictional version of the Lake Nyasa phenomenon in Steven Brust's The Phoenix Guards (paragraphs 5 & 6 of that page).
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awarded  Famous Question
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accepted Forming the possessive of a username that is a contraction
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5
comment Forming the possessive of a username that is a contraction
True, it's an edge situation. Any chance you have a reference source? "Always form the possessive with an apostrophe, no exceptions" -- Bloom Picayune Style Guide?
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asked Forming the possessive of a username that is a contraction
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awarded  Famous Question
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awarded  Nice Question
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Notable Question
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revised Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
deleted 36 characters in body
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accepted Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
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comment Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
tchrist says "only senators, governors, presidents, and officers in the armed forces" keep their titles, while your rule excludes the middle two -- they are "individual" offices -- and adds others, such as judges and ambassadors (and presumably U.S. Representatives). Thanks for the further documentation!
Aug
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comment Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
The Powell example is in accordance with the reference that choster gives: "General" is a senior military rank. I'll look for Schorr's description.
Aug
20
revised Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
Spelling corrections.
Aug
20
suggested suggested edit on Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
Aug
20
comment Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
choster's answer contradicts your rule, and links to a reference, although I'm not certain about its reliability. Do you know where the rule you've given might be written down?
Aug
20
comment Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
I like the "obsequiousness elevator" phrase! Your answer contradicts tchrist's, but you have provided a reference, which seems fairly authoritative (although it's only four years old as far as I can tell). I don't suppose you have any other source?
Aug
20
comment Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
I see your point -- would explicitly restricting the question to U.S. usage (since that's what I'm interested in) help? Any use of honorifics must be largely language-specific. I know, for example, that in French "Doctor" is only used for medical professionals, whereas I believe German uses something like "Mr./Mrs. Doctor" for anyone with a PhD.
Aug
20
comment Addressing a former office-holder by that office's title
Does this mean that it is (or was) likewise a breach of protocol to not use the title for a former (e.g.) senator?