1,211 reputation
39
bio website
location Aurora, OR
age 52
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Nov 18 at 23:10

Thirty years a software developer, I have more recently become a proofreader and editor as well.


Oct
23
comment Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)?
Aha! A name for those! I first proposed that exact set of pronouns in a writing assignment for an online class years ago, and have been using them ever since. I had no idea that they were in use anywhere else. And I fervently hope they DO catch on! It would simplify many discussions, and the rule is easy to remember. I use the original versions, and not the modified ones, but either would work for me.
Oct
22
comment What does “if and when” mean, and is it the same as “when and if”?
I have to disagree that the idiom is intentionally confusing or ambiguous. Rewrite it thus: "When X - if X happens - do Y." The sense is not of certainty but to clarify intent. No confusion is created. E.g.: "If and when I die in an accident, do not donate any of my organs" translates "if the cause of my death is accidental, do not donate anything of mine to science." It would be wrong to say when, since it might not happen; it is also wrong to only say if, because that does not clarify the timing. And, to use only if leaves my intent open to doubt in regard to other cases.
Oct
22
comment Term for inefficiency inherent in hierarchical allocation
I thought about this long and hard before I answered, and these are my thoughts. First, the very concept is difficult, as this thread shows. So probably no concise expression of it will convey the right idea. Second, I believe that "Shannon entropy" is the precise name for what you are looking for; so to use that term is to state it concisely, but the information theory page is difficult for the layman to read. So since a discussion is necessary, perhaps the best solution is simply to reference this discussion?
Oct
21
answered Word/term for “the ability to affect history or make things happen”?
Oct
21
answered Term for inefficiency inherent in hierarchical allocation
Oct
21
comment More general version of “finger on the pulse”
Yes, and to make the extent greater, say "a sharp eye" or "an eagle eye" on it.
Oct
21
answered A word to make something bad sound good
Oct
21
comment Looking for an alternate word for 'Acquisition'
A shorter form of that word is "Acquired"; a synonym might be "#Lic Held" or just Held. (Once you acquire a license, you hold it, yes?)
Oct
17
comment Comma or no comma before the word “and”
I have to agree with Edwin here (-1). Entirely arbitrary, this set of rules is very inadequate, taking into account none of the historical nor stylistic considerations that matter much more than this rigid form.
Oct
17
answered Do certain contrasting conjunctions + certain contrasting adverbs = redundancy?
Oct
17
answered Looking for an alternate word for 'Acquisition'
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
14
answered English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”
Jul
14
comment “Rejoice to hear it”
Yes, @jwpat7, but then you had already said it was the modern meaning. I was just agreeing. And I have read lots of those 1800's era novels, including all 28 Elsie Dinsmore books, in which the phrase was used. Mostly because the antecedents would be considered stunning good news by the almost universally positive characters.
Jul
14
answered Meaning (not in economics) - 'deflationary'
Jul
14
comment “Rejoice to hear it”
It is true: Unless said in reference to truly stunning good news "I rejoice to hear it" is an overstatement, a sense aptly captured by Shakespeare's "Methinks the woman doth protest too much." Because it is just too giddy, it is most likely sarcasm.
Jul
14
answered Laid—Had Laid … Which is correct?
Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
answered Word for light after it has passed through a window / glass
Jan
23
comment Does “less than” really mean “subtracted from”, or is it bad English?
Both this word order and the inverted word order are correct English. I heard both in school and, as you state in response to Pete Kirkham, one "sounds normal" to you and me both. Using the reverse introduces cognitive dissonance, as does any unusual inversion of word order. This may be simply a technique to draw attention to the facts; my teachers certainly did this purposefully. But it does not make it grammatically incorrect.