1,102 reputation
38
bio website
location Aurora, OR
age 52
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jul 14 at 6:10

Thirty years a software developer, I have more recently become a proofreader and editor as well.


Jul
14
answered English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”
Jul
14
comment “Rejoice to hear it”
Yes, @jwpat7, but then you had already said it was the modern meaning. I was just agreeing. And I have read lots of those 1800's era novels, including all 28 Elsie Dinsmore books, in which the phrase was used. Mostly because the antecedents would be considered stunning good news by the almost universally positive characters.
Jul
14
comment The name of the road is Hillsdown Road?Should the letter R be capital or small?
This is so common a question, it ought to be found in any standard reference. Hence the downvote (not mine).
Jul
14
answered Meaning (not in economics) - 'deflationary'
Jul
14
comment “Rejoice to hear it”
It is true: Unless said in reference to truly stunning good news "I rejoice to hear it" is an overstatement, a sense aptly captured by Shakespeare's "Methinks the woman doth protest too much." Because it is just too giddy, it is most likely sarcasm.
Jul
14
answered Laid—Had Laid … Which is correct?
Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Feb
17
answered Word for light after it has passed through a window / glass
Jan
23
comment Does “less than” really mean “subtracted from”, or is it bad English?
Both this word order and the inverted word order are correct English. I heard both in school and, as you state in response to Pete Kirkham, one "sounds normal" to you and me both. Using the reverse introduces cognitive dissonance, as does any unusual inversion of word order. This may be simply a technique to draw attention to the facts; my teachers certainly did this purposefully. But it does not make it grammatically incorrect.
Nov
8
comment Singular Verb Following “One of . . .”
@mikhailcazi No, it does not have the same meaning as the original sentence; I did not intend that it should. It does not sound odd to me, however, because I have often said something similar, with a pause (that could of course be set off by commas but not require it). The way you give does not sound more natural to me, but it is more clearly stated.
Nov
7
answered What do you call the person who always picks up the phone when you need them?
Nov
6
comment Singular Verb Following “One of . . .”
Add 'the' to make: "He is the one of the men who does the work." Now 'one' is no longer part of the men, but singled out to become the antecedent of the verb.
Nov
6
answered What's the meaning of “pence” in this context?
Nov
6
answered Usage of reflexive pronouns
Nov
6
answered Another word for workbench or tools?
Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Mar
25
answered Why do I never hear people say “I get to go now”?
Mar
25
comment “Subpage” vs “sub page” vs is it even a word?
With the advent of the web, "page" took on new and different meanings. Prior to that, a page (of text, that is) was always a single sheet of paper. Now a page can be dynamic, and therefore a subpage has meaning -- but it has not had such meaning for long, so it can be considered a new word not yet found in dictionaries, and certainly not in automated word checkers.
Feb
21
answered “You get what you deserve nothing more nothing less”
Feb
21
comment Object complement adjective, or direct object, or?
Yes, an adjective can modify an adjective. But often the order matters. You can, after all, say, "Jill painted the kitchen a red rosy color." Here they are clearly both adjectives. "Elided," by the way, indicates a missing word in the original sentence.