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"Semi-retired" from English.SE for now. It was a lot of fun for a few months, but it's too addictive.


Jan
20
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
27
comment Indian-English usage of “Kindly”
It's not a mistake.
Dec
21
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Nov
27
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Oct
4
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Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
29
comment What is meant by “steep learning curve”?
@Peter: The technical meaning of "learning curve" is well-established in the literature, so we can't just swap the axes without adding to the confusion. (Besides, it seems weird to have something so regularly increasing as time on the y-axis, and have the actually variable quantity (learning) on the x-axis. Usually if one of the axes is time, it's drawn on the x-axis.)
Sep
24
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9
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Aug
27
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Aug
22
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Aug
5
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31
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23
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Jul
2
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Apr
2
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
@JoeBlow: No I didn't misunderstand you, and I wasn't thinking that. I was pointing out that, just as western people seem to think that of appearance or ability is "politically incorrect", but their minds freely wander to infidelity, the Japanese may be the opposite. It's just a matter of which aspects a culture decides are taboo; it's not a matter of one being unequivocally "less PC" than the other.
Apr
2
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
You interpret this an example of Japanese being "incredibly less politically correct" than English, but I can also see it as the opposite. Many responses here immediately jump to thinking of infidelity on the part of the woman, whereas the Japanese are comfortable talking of the simple fact of nature that children do not always resemble their parents in every respect (in "face, figure and temper" as the OP says), without any implicit innuendo about infidelity. (The OP seems to have needed to add "though they are their parents' real child" to the question, having not thought of it before.)
Mar
28
comment What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
@JoeBlow: Ah ok. :-) Sorry for any misunderstanding; I wasn't in the best mood yesterday. I actually agree that there aren't any common terms in English either: I've updated the answer to say that.