Reputation
20,020
Next tag badge:
235/100 score
14/20 answers
Badges
2 62 92
Newest
 Guru
Impact
~1.3m people reached

Jul
24
comment What’s the rule for using “who” and “whom” correctly?
@JeffLockhart: Your latter comment is correct and the former wrong: "many of whom" is what follows from the rules mentioned in these answers. You'd say "many of them", not "many of they", and similarly you'd say "many of us", not "many of we". Similarly, "many of whom", not "many of who", is the traditionally correct answer. (But as always, when in doubt use "who".)
Jul
20
awarded  Guru
Jul
14
comment Is “certainly possible” an oxymoron?
@deadrat What confused me when reading your answer is that you're using "modifies" in the grammatical sense, but it is easy to read it in the common-language sense of "changes". If you say "certainly possible" instead of "possible", you are not changing (modifying) the possibility, what you are changing is your certainty about the possibility.
Jul
8
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
22
awarded  Guru
Jun
9
comment Why does “impregnable” mean *cannot be impregnated*?
@JoeBlow I completely agree that "fill, permeate, imbue, soak, etc" has no hint or suggestion of "penetrate, break in to, enter by force etc", and never, not even while asking the question, have I thought or suggested otherwise. But when you assert that even calling these sets of meanings close (at a stretch) is "simply quite wrong", you seem to be using a definition of "close" (and "stretch") that is somewhat different from that of at least a few people. But I understand what you mean. Cheers,
May
3
comment What is origin of suffix '-stan', as in Hindustan, Afghanistan?
In addition to etymonline that @JanusBahsJacquet mentioned, also see the Wikipedia article on the suffix -stan. It is from Persian -stān, which is cognate with Sanskrit स्थान (sthāna). (That is, the suffix -stan in the place names is not from Sanskrit, but both the Persian root and the Sanskrit root have a common origin.)
Feb
24
awarded  Great Answer
Feb
12
awarded  Guru
Jan
20
awarded  Good Answer
Dec
27
comment Indian-English usage of “Kindly”
It's not a mistake.
Dec
21
awarded  Guru
Nov
27
awarded  Good Answer
Oct
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
29
comment What is meant by “steep learning curve”?
@Peter: The technical meaning of "learning curve" is well-established in the literature, so we can't just swap the axes without adding to the confusion. (Besides, it seems weird to have something so regularly increasing as time on the y-axis, and have the actually variable quantity (learning) on the x-axis. Usually if one of the axes is time, it's drawn on the x-axis.)
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
9
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
27
awarded  Good Answer
Aug
22
awarded  Guru