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"Semi-retired" from English.SE for now. It was a lot of fun for a few months, but it's too addictive.


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Aug
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Aug
22
awarded  Guru
Aug
5
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Jul
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Apr
2
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
@JoeBlow: No I didn't misunderstand you, and I wasn't thinking that. I was pointing out that, just as western people seem to think that of appearance or ability is "politically incorrect", but their minds freely wander to infidelity, the Japanese may be the opposite. It's just a matter of which aspects a culture decides are taboo; it's not a matter of one being unequivocally "less PC" than the other.
Apr
2
comment What do you call the child who doesn’t resemble his / her parents in English?
You interpret this an example of Japanese being "incredibly less politically correct" than English, but I can also see it as the opposite. Many responses here immediately jump to thinking of infidelity on the part of the woman, whereas the Japanese are comfortable talking of the simple fact of nature that children do not always resemble their parents in every respect (in "face, figure and temper" as the OP says), without any implicit innuendo about infidelity. (The OP seems to have needed to add "though they are their parents' real child" to the question, having not thought of it before.)
Mar
28
comment What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
@JoeBlow: Ah ok. :-) Sorry for any misunderstanding; I wasn't in the best mood yesterday. I actually agree that there aren't any common terms in English either: I've updated the answer to say that.
Mar
28
revised What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
no consistent terminology
Mar
27
comment What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
@JoeBlow: Finally, I'm not sure why you're seeking personal information about me. (You can look at my profile to see my other answers on this website.) If you really need to know, I can tell you (English is the medium of all my education, the language I'm most comfortable in, and I find the notion of "native speaker" one that imperfectly captures one's proficiency in a language, e.g. given that it's native speakers who make more mistakes of the your/you're, their/they're type), but this is a strange question to encounter on the internet.
Mar
27
comment What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
@JoeBlow: Sorry I didn't notice you had posted an answer: I was only notified of your comments here, and I additionally looked at your comment on Matt's answer because you pointed me to it, and in neither place did I see your view that there is no consistent term. That may well be the case, but as the answer above shows, at least one term that exists is "tabs", and it has enough support in books. Other terms may also have some support. To take X more seriously than Y is to give it more importance than Y.
Mar
27
comment What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
@JoeBlow: You didn't answer: What have you heard them referred to as? :-) And in any case the number of people playing jigsaw puzzles is much larger than those constructing them, so it's not clear that the terminology used by programmers should be taken more seriously than that used by those marketing, playing, or studying jigsaw puzzles.
Mar
27
comment What do you call the interconnecting bits of a puzzle piece in English?
@JoeBlow: What does software engineering have to do with jigsaw puzzles? And what have you heard them referred to as? When I did the search back when I posted the answer, I did find an overwhelming majority of sources use "tabs", as I said in the answer.
Mar
13
comment Usage of 'at' and 'in' for cities
@mplungjan: I'm from India and I have never heard of sitting on a table (except of course the standard meaning, of actually sitting atop it). Sitting on a chair, yes.
Jan
17
comment “Do the media…” or “Does the media”?
@Susan: Fair enough. I agree as you have pointed out that there are two issues in "do the media": one, whether each medium is being considered separately (as in "do the different media have different effects on their readers/listeners/viewers?"), and two, whether we use "formal agreement" (as always in AmE) or "notional agreement" (as often in BrE). So the answer to the question is probably that the latter is being used. Indeed, searching online for "do the media exploit" throws up mostly BrE sources. However, it is also possible (as I guess you think) that it may be confusion with the former.
Jan
17
comment “Do the media…” or “Does the media”?
@Susan: What is "Inclusive English"? Of course American publications are more numerous than British, so unless you've filtered that out in your ngram statistics, the results are irrelevant to the issue at hand (on top of all the usual issues with ngram statistics).