235 reputation
126
bio website google.com
location Omaha, AR
age 28
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jan 3 at 18:46

Avid HTML5/Web app enthusiast, AJAX blackbelt, graphic artist, database management apprentice. Web designer by trade.


Apr
9
awarded  Famous Question
Dec
21
awarded  Notable Question
May
4
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
22
awarded  Yearling
Dec
1
comment Is there a term that defines nostalgia for something you've never experienced?
I suppose it would make decent sense to just explicitly state nostalgia being without experience, this I think would be more widely digestible for readers than any lesser known term.
Dec
1
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
1
comment Is there a term that defines nostalgia for something you've never experienced?
I suppose that is about right; I mean it doesn't exactly capture the meaning, but with supporting statements that would be a good word to finish the thought with.
Dec
1
accepted Is there a term that defines nostalgia for something you've never experienced?
Nov
30
asked Is there a term that defines nostalgia for something you've never experienced?
Nov
28
comment “Is there something wrong?” or “Is there anything wrong?”
I meant it to be awkward (too subtle a point I suppose). In context though, you're right if someone asks if you want something/anything it works either way. Still, I think there's a distinctive feel to the two words. They can't be swapped without at least mildly changing the meaning in many cases.
Nov
27
comment “Is there something wrong?” or “Is there anything wrong?”
I don't think the two are synonyms; I think 'something' infers you want to make the decision, whereas 'anything' means the other party will make the decision. If you said "I want something to eat" you will make the call on what you will eat, but if you said "I want anything to eat!" it means you'll take whatever the other party offers.
Nov
15
comment Is there a word for telling the truth (technically) in order to misguide?
I think deceive is more appropriate. Even if it isn't, deception is a more established word, and it doesn't break immersion in the sentence for people who have never heard of dissembling. The flow is better, in my opinion. Unless the sentence is meant to seem a tad snooty, then dissembling would be spot on.
Nov
8
awarded  Scholar
Nov
8
accepted Is it wrong to use “All” when there are only two?
Apr
22
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
22
awarded  Supporter
Apr
22
awarded  Student
Feb
18
asked Is it wrong to use “All” when there are only two?