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Dec
19
awarded  Enlightened
Dec
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
11
revised Therefore vs. wherefore
added 275 characters in body
Dec
11
answered Therefore vs. wherefore
Dec
10
answered Truancy or Skip class
Dec
9
comment Antonym of hagiography
Excellent choices, thank you. FWIW, I always think it is helpful to put a link to a dictionary definition of the words. However, I looked them up myself.
Dec
9
accepted Antonym of hagiography
Dec
9
asked Antonym of hagiography
Dec
9
answered Is there a term for the use of an unnecessary or redundant adjective?
Dec
8
comment Etymology of “compiler” (computer term)
I'll be interested to know the answer too, because I agree, translator does sound better. "Compiler" would seem to apply more to what is traditionally called a "linker".
Nov
14
awarded  single-word-requests
Nov
13
comment What words can I use to express a “great time”?
Thanks @MarvMills, I added it with a H/T to you.
Nov
13
revised What words can I use to express a “great time”?
added 50 characters in body
Nov
13
answered What words can I use to express a “great time”?
Nov
13
revised What do you call someone whom a gift is intended for?
added 1207 characters in body
Nov
13
comment What do you call someone whom a gift is intended for?
I agree with @Josh61. I checked a few dictionaries and they don't have it, though it is in the crowd sourced wiktionary. So I'd say it is a word in transition, and I'd also say that very few native speakers would actually understand what the word means.
Nov
13
comment What do you call someone whom a gift is intended for?
No, @Socce, that would not seem at all weird, it would be a perfectly reasonable question, in fact it would be a pretty common way to ask. You are also correct that: "who is it for?" would be the more common of the two though.
Nov
12
answered What do you call someone whom a gift is intended for?
Nov
10
answered Name for the relationship between a person and a person's ancestor?
Nov
10
comment “Any question” versus “any questions”
This is a duplicate english.stackexchange.com/questions/23618/…