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May
24
answered Is “coin” still used to mean “money”?
Apr
17
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
4
awarded  Yearling
Mar
23
answered When citing a French citation in the original, should the guillemets (angle quotes) be changed? What about punctuation order?
Mar
10
answered Is there any difference between these two sentences?
Mar
8
answered Is there a phrase for “a close distance”?
Jan
19
awarded  Good Question
Jan
15
answered Looking seductively at someone
Jan
7
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
7
comment What's the term to describe 'normal' languages, such as English, Chinese and Russian as opposed to programming languages?
Further, I don't agree that Java is a language primarily aimed at humans. The purpose of Java is to allow a human to communicate with a computer the programmers intent, and to do so in a manner most understandable to a human. The purpose, the intent, of a program (generally speaking) is to execute, not to be understood. Java is a better programming language than assembly language because it bridges the gap between the computer and the human. Don Knuth has made his carrier partly on the notion that humans need more than program text to be understood.
Jan
7
comment What's the term to describe 'normal' languages, such as English, Chinese and Russian as opposed to programming languages?
But essentially the same argument can be made against "natural language." For example, mathematical notation or musical notation are languages that naturally arose in humans and (to use wiktionary) "human language which has evolved naturally in a community". However, it is obviously not categorically similar to Chinese and Russian. Words don't have tight boundaries, however, in my view it is unlikely that a reasonable person would consider Java a human language, and (IMHO) it is unlikely that a reasonable person would consider either Math or Esperanto a natural language. (cont...)
Jan
6
comment I'm tired of writing out the phrase “himself or herself”. What are my options?
I'm curious Jon as to why you chose to use diacritics in rôle and coëxistance. They are certainly valid alternative spellings, but the unadorned are surely more common, and a lot easier to type. FWIW, I found their presence made me think about your spelling more than your content.
Jan
6
answered What's the term to describe 'normal' languages, such as English, Chinese and Russian as opposed to programming languages?
Jan
6
answered Equivalent to “stay tuned”, but not for TV or radio?
Jan
6
answered I'm tired of writing out the phrase “himself or herself”. What are my options?
Jan
5
answered Point someone to something
Jan
5
comment Is “diplomations” a coined word possibly used in journalism or in politics?
FWIW, to me on the tape it just sounds like she misspoke, simply meaning "diplomatic relations". It doesn't sound like she was trying to coin a new word at all.
Jan
4
revised “Speak English” vs. “speak in English”
added 1386 characters in body
Jan
4
comment “Speak English” vs. “speak in English”
There really isn't much difference in understanding. But I added an addendum to my answer to offer a contrast.
Jan
4
answered “The boy was very sad when his toy fell on the ground” - is “sad” a subject complement?