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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Dec 16 at 0:49

Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
10
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
21
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
26
accepted Who is the authority — scientists, or linguists — on the definitions of everyday words referring to types of animals?
Jun
26
asked Who is the authority — scientists, or linguists — on the definitions of everyday words referring to types of animals?
Jun
20
comment Usage of “East Indian” to distinguish from “Native American”
No one will be confused if you say Native American. But I'm not asking how to refer to Native Americans, I'm asking about how to refer to people from India. If I say "Indian" without clarification, especially if I am in parts of the US where Native Americans commonly refer to themselves an "Indian," and where there are very few people from India, people will not know which I am referring to. If EVERYONE did as you suggest, we'd be fine. But I can't change what everyone does, all I can do is choose the words I use so that I will be understood. And your suggestion is not helpful there.
Jun
20
awarded  Critic
May
23
awarded  Popular Question
May
13
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
25
accepted What is the meaning of the word “this,” all by itself?
Apr
25
asked What is the meaning of the word “this,” all by itself?
Apr
19
awarded  Yearling
Apr
19
comment Looking for a suffix that is opposite of “-prone”, but softer than “-proof”
Perfect, thank you! I feel kind of dumb now for not thinking of that....it felt like it was on the tip of my tongue!
Apr
19
accepted Looking for a suffix that is opposite of “-prone”, but softer than “-proof”
Apr
19
asked Looking for a suffix that is opposite of “-prone”, but softer than “-proof”
Mar
19
revised Why is the term “touched” no longer commonly used?
added 301 characters in body
Mar
19
comment Why is the term “touched” no longer commonly used?
Thanks. Not that I was offended or anything. :) One thing that is ashame with regarding this term is that it is pretty much impossible to track the usage of the term without "in the head" appended to it, since "touched" is most often used in other ways.
Mar
19
comment Why is the term “touched” no longer commonly used?
Well the euphemism is obviously based on some knowledge of autism, since it is essentially jargon from the field, but appropriated into popular vernacular. Unlike "touched", which I don't gather ever had any medical or psychiatric basis. And I agree that people probably shouldn't be using "on the spectrum" in that flippant sort of way, but I don't think there is any way to prevent people in general from speculating as to what mental disorder someone might have. (and it might be better than just labeling someone as a "weirdo" or a "spaz" or something)
Mar
19
comment Why is the term “touched” no longer commonly used?
Well I'll give you a +1 for the well researched answer, but saying I indulge in pious wishful thinking might not be the best strategy for having it accepted as the answer. :)
Mar
19
accepted Why is the term “touched” no longer commonly used?