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Jun
24
comment Equivalent for “née” in spoken English
I can see why you say it "sounds like a negation", but I still think it is right to say "née". I don't think anyone would be very likely to misunderstand.
Jun
24
comment The attachment has “already been sent” or has “been already sent”?
You could also say "the attachment has been sent already".
Jun
3
comment Pessimism idiom - opposite of rose-tinted glasses?
I don't think there is a direct equivalent in English.
May
9
comment Is there a word to describe curiosity in a positive way?
What is the context?
May
9
comment Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
@TheMathemagician Sorry- hadn't noticed that answer was yours.
May
9
comment Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
@TheMathemagician Perhaps you could post one of your wiki sources you refer to? If it's as clear cut as you suggest, I'd expect a google search of "difference between britain and great britain" would give a definitive answer. But it doesn't- It shows there is some debate.
May
9
comment Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
@msam I never took it that way. I thought "Great" was added to make it sound grandiose- ironic for a cookery program.
May
9
comment Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
"The adjective "Great British" is occasionally used, often in an ironic way, but not referring to individuals." e.g. The Great British Bake-off
May
9
comment Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
@TheMathemagician As I said, I have no opinion on the matter. Maybe you're right, and both sources are wrong (although you still haven't posted any source that backs up your statements). My question still stands- Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
May
8
comment Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?
@TheMathemagician You may be right- I don't have any opinion on it myself. I've posted another source now (from Ordinance Survey). Do you have any source to suggest it is wrong?
Mar
11
comment Need a word for "Should not have happened' with a negative context
How exactly would the word be used in the situation you describe?
Mar
10
comment Using “should” makes a sentence sound feminine?
This sounds incredibly subjective.
Jan
23
comment Are “tomorrow” and “morning” etymologically related?
@Kosmonaut If I change the German phrase to the one in more common usage, it defeats the purpose of the question. It may not be commonly said, but it is still grammatically acceptable.
Dec
19
comment What is a term for someone who is bad at communicating with other people?
Introverts, shy and socially timid people are not necessarily bad communicators. They just don't like to do it.
Dec
19
comment What is a term for someone who is bad at communicating with other people?
Oh, and I'd like to preempt whoever was about to say "Computer Programmer" or suchlike. :-)
Dec
16
comment Why is Santa Claus a man but Santa Maria a woman?
@Mari-Lou I'll leave my new title. I think it addresses the real question I'm asking here and prevents the "half-answers" that my original title attracted. And I agree with the question closure- I didn't notice the duplicate answer.
Dec
13
comment Why is Santa Claus a man but Santa Maria a woman?
@FumbleFingers My point is that your links only answer part of the question- It explains that "Santa" in Santa Claus comes from the Dutch. It doesn't explain why it is different to the other "Santa" saints.
Dec
12
comment Why is Santa Claus a man but Santa Maria a woman?
@FumbleFingers But that's not the question. The question is why it does not conform to the same naming conventions of other saints.
Dec
12
comment Why is Santa Claus a man but Santa Maria a woman?
I think so. English speakers call him "Santa Claus", don't they. It just has foreign origins.
Dec
9
comment Can you have any kind of “snap” other than a cold one?
So really the word "cold" is effectively redundant. Cold snaps are the only kind of snaps there are.