FrustratedWithFormsDesigner

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Mar
25
comment Is this translation of a joke grammatically correct?
@Stijn: Your first attempt is also correct, but the language is much more formal. Formal language works well in a joke when the formal language itself is a part of the joke.
Mar
25
answered Is this translation of a joke grammatically correct?
Mar
4
comment “Next to” is to horizontal as what is to vertical?
@mplungjan: The OP wants a word that implies "on top of" as well as "below".
Mar
4
comment “Next to” is to horizontal as what is to vertical?
@CrisStringfellow: "Next to" would be an alternative to "horizontally adjacent".
Feb
8
answered Reversing name order
Jan
24
awarded  Enlightened
Jan
16
comment Equivalent for Dutch commode?
@drjerry: Does the cloth hang suspended over the table, or does it lie upon the surface of the table? "a cloth over the changing table" suggests the first (to me, amyway) but "a cloth on the changing table" suggests the second.
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
11
reviewed Approve suggested edit on An idiom to describe someone who thinks he/she is wiser than others
Jan
11
answered An idiom to describe someone who thinks he/she is wiser than others
Jan
7
comment Are “flower” and “flour” always homophones?
@tchrist: Sort of like the French word fleur, which is one syllable, but it had an "ou" sound instead of the "eu" sound. I wish I'd recorded it so I could play it back. ;)
Jan
7
comment Are “flower” and “flour” always homophones?
Anecdotally, I'd say usually but not always. I've heard one person pronounce "flour" as a one-syllable word where they pronounce "flower" as a distinctly two-syllable word. I don't know where they learned to speak that way, and I don't know if it's common where they come from. I'm pretty sure that English was their first language (but I suppose there's a chance could be wrong).
Dec
23
awarded  Taxonomist
Dec
6
comment What is a more modern variant of the interjection 'Lo!"
Can you give us a sentence you'd be using it in?
Nov
30
comment What does “creep” mean in the song “Creep” by Radiohead?
I don't know Portuguese, but I think you're on the right track with esquisito; "creep" could be a "person who is very weird", though it usually has slightly negative implications (weird in a "bad" way).
Nov
30
revised What does “creep” mean in the song “Creep” by Radiohead?
deleted 1 characters in body
Nov
23
revised On the interpretation of “walked to the station at 9 o'clock”
added 2 characters in body
Oct
25
comment “Godness” vs. “goddess”
Are you sure it's not a typo, that someone meant to write "Oh my goodness!" I have never seen the usage you show. Could you proved some links to examples?
Oct
17
comment What's the equivalent phrase in the UK for “I plead the fifth”?
@Zairja: It may vary by country, and you'd probably want to talk to a lawyer of such countries to make sure you get it right.
Oct
16
comment Is there a word for fake company history?
...or how about origin story? Or maybe creation myth? ;)