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2d
answered “The woman's card” vs “the woman card”
Apr
29
answered Someone who does not like excess
Apr
21
comment Is “Hello, World!” a sentence?
I don't think they are clauses by any common definition of clause.
Apr
21
comment Correct punctuation to separate the elements of this sentence
@FumbleFingers, it's a simple fact that the sentence in question contains an implicit, elided subject. If we had a function in a computer program called Sum(x, y) and there was a comment on it saying "Returns the sum of x and y," then the implicit subject is "the function below", or "Sum(x, y)".
Apr
21
comment Correct punctuation to separate the elements of this sentence
I think this is the right approach. Rewrite the sentence to make its structure less ambiguous.
Apr
21
comment Correct punctuation to separate the elements of this sentence
@FumbleFingers, there is an implicit subject.
Apr
21
comment Is Hangman a Gender Neutral term?
The gender-neutral term would be hangperson. There is a great gender disparity in the hangperson profession. Girls at school need to be encouraged to become hangpersons.
Apr
21
comment “Tenants” of an argument
@stevesliva, I reread it, and I think you could very well be right. It depends on what the antecedent of "this" is: Sanders being our last chance? Or one person one vote? Or even the fact that we live in an oligarchy? Honestly it's not clear to me what this guy is trying to say there. I think he should forget about fancy technical words for the moment and instead focus on the clarity of his message.
Apr
20
comment “Tenants” of an argument
@stevesliva, a premise is a proposition that has a true or false value. "One person one vote" here expresses an "ought". It is a principle, not a proposition. Tenet works well.
Apr
20
comment What does “My tongue doubles back” mean?
I googled that book and read some bits and pieces of it. Just a warning for you if you aren't a native speaker: the English in the book is pretty eccentric, and there are lots of errors in it (it really needs a good edit). I found it kind of hard to understand in places. Maybe it's Indian English?
Apr
20
comment what is the meaning of “High D”?
It doesn't mean anything to me. What is the context?
Apr
19
comment What is the word for a non-creative task?
@user568458, I write software for a living, and a large part of my job is grunt work, even though that's still skilled work. It's just stuff that needs to be done but doesn't take much creativity. "Grunt work" is the term we use among ourselves where I work, in fact. I do agree with you however that building as a whole is not grunt work, and I have much respect for the skill and creativity of builders.
Apr
18
answered What is the word for a non-creative task?
Apr
13
answered Term for a person who is fond of stationery items
Apr
7
answered Word used to describe a contradictory appearance for the intended meaning of a word?
Apr
7
comment Finding a more common word for “mundanity”
Quotidian isn't necessarily mundane or negative. You have listed a secondary definition. Primarily it just means occurring every day. A quotidian cup of coffee might be a mini highlight someone's day.
Apr
6
comment What do you call a person who is dogmatic in their opinion until someone they see as an authority has an opposing view, and they then flip?
Or a sheep in wolves' clothing?
Apr
3
comment Idiom for someone who buys all the best gear to do something before they even have a basic proficiency?
Someone who has to have all the latest and greatest gear is often referred to as a gear whore. I don't think that necessarily suggests they don't know how to use their gear though.
Mar
30
comment Is there an English term for being enraged by injustice, or having an extreme emotional stress because of injustice?
@zeugma, what if you caught someone in the act of abusing your child, and you beat them up or killed them. That would be a crime of passion, wouldn't it?
Mar
29
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