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Feb
8
comment Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
@AleksandarĐorđević That's perfectly fine. You can say Life is better with a pet, and we'll all understand that you mean a cat, a dog, etc. But you probably don't mean to exclude cases where someone has both a dog and a cat, or two dogs, etc., and as a native AmE speaker I think it's unlikely that anyone in that situation would feel excluded. You could also think of your cat and her dog at the same time, and say Life is better with pets, and again the statement is sufficiently general that nobody who only owns one pet will feel slighted. In short: it works either way.
Feb
7
comment Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
Nobody would infer that multiple pets are required for a better life from life is better with pets.
Feb
7
comment Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
Either one really works fine, unless your study finds specifically that owning more than one pet is a benefit.
Jan
30
comment English equivalent for “Picking a fight with your mother because you…”
American version: get one's panties in a wad/knot.
Jan
29
comment What do you call a unit of beer within a pack?
Easily misunderstood in the world of distribution. You could ask someone to get you one container and end up with a giant steel box.
Jan
19
comment Word or phrase for “it won't change anything, but we'll protest anyways”
This phrase strongly connotes continuing to do something after it has become futile; you wouldn't use it if the situation were hopeless at the outset.
Jan
19
comment Word or phrase for “it won't change anything, but we'll protest anyways”
Sisyphean is the best answer, IMO. Maybe it's just my interpretation, but I always think of "pissing into the wind" to have an element of backfiring: if you try it, you end up covered in piss. Howling at the wind might convey the sense of futility without the adverse consequence. Sting wrote it's like singing in the wind or writing on the surface of a lake, but he stole that from Catullus.
Oct
14
comment Who would address the issue this fall?
I'm not convinced that it's necessary to characterize the announcement as either ironic or cynical. Any meaningful reduction in carbon emission must be lead by China and the US because they're the largest emitters. And in any case, the political commentary doesn't contribute anything to the OP's understanding of sentence structure.
Jul
31
comment Word for a room with washing machines in it?
@Sawbones That's true in the context of a commercial or apartment building where there might actually be a janitor, but a 'utility room' in a house or apartment is typically a space with water heater, washer/dryer, HVAC, etc.
Dec
16
comment “Off the wall” vs. “Off of the wall”
@KristinaLopez Here's one that suggests that: etymonline.com/…
Aug
23
comment Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?
Followed by: but is there an actual word which does that? The question could use some work.
Aug
22
comment Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?
That is a pronoun, so it's true that it's job is to take the place of a noun, but it's always used with an antecedent or at least some sort of (possibly nonverbal) indication of what the speaker intends to refer to. In this question the OP seems to be asking for a placeholder word that can be used without indicating its meaning. Also, that in He looked like that is still a pronoun, not an adjective.
Nov
8
comment What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?
Someone who matures or evolves into a zombie isn't starting from a very good place -- those words generally connote a positive change. Devolves would be a better choice to describe most people undergoing zombification, although there are certainly exceptions.
Nov
4
comment Word or phrase for “seeing meaning where none exists”
Meaning exists where we find it. If a reader finds meaning that the author didn't intend, who's to say that it doesn't exist?
Aug
10
comment Why is “I’m doing great” correct?
@JanusBahsJacquet That's what I wrote, in fact, but someone missed my point and edited my answer. :-)
Jul
16
comment Revealing that someone else is gay — counterpart to “come out”
outed isn't specific to revealing sexual preference. It's often used that way and has that connotation in many contexts, but it can refer to the revelation of any secret identity. For example: J.K. Rowling was recently outed as the author of _Cuckoo's Calling_. (I'm not disagreeing with p.s.w.g here, just trying to clarify.)
Jun
20
comment Is a “doozy” a good or bad thing?
Wiktionary seems to rely on World Wide Words:Doozy for this information. IMO, it's silly to discount the influence of Duesenberg automobiles, too. The Duesenberg name may not have been the genesis of the term doozy, but the Duesie nickname may have reinforced the meaning and made the term even more common. It's been quite a while since I read it, but I think I remember a reference to Duesenberg as a source for doozy in The Great Cars.
Jan
26
comment Is there a word for numbers between 10 and 99?
@Lynn Depends on context. I'm sure you've heard six figure salary or that a jury awarded damages reaching well into nine figures. But yeah, agree that we'd never talk about a two figure number here in the US.
Dec
1
comment Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
@FumbleFingers I don't think this is a dupe of the linked question at all. This Q relates to a particular construction whereas the linked Q is about something else entirely. They do both deal with personal pronouns, but they're not the same question.
Dec
1
comment Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
Great answer -- thanks so much!