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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Sep 8 at 19:39

profile for Caleb on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


You: Do you know Jon Skeet?

Expert: I once tried to convince the community, it worked remarkably well.

You: Do you know Joel Spolsky?

Expert: I know joel spolsky to a certain degree at least.

You: Does he treat you well?

Expert: :)

You: What is it like to work at Stack Exchange?

Expert: The answer is pretty complicated.

You: I'm listening.

Expert: I used to know someone who was listening.


Sep
7
answered What do you call this type of lock?
Sep
7
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
7
awarded  Nice Answer
Sep
7
comment Origin of “bug” in reference to software
@Nikko, I added the "update" section to point back to the Wikipedia article specifically because I realized that "debug" (not to mention "bug") was not coined by Adm. Hopper. Nevertheless, if you ask anyone who knows something about computing lore about "bug", Adm. Hopper's name and this story are bound to come up, and the moth taped in the notebook will forever be "the first computer bug." She may not have coined the term, but she unquestionably cemented it in the daily lexicon of computing.
Sep
7
comment Origin of “bug” in reference to software
@benzado, I realize that the original question was about "bug," not "debug." I answered this back on StackOverflow, where the two terms are inextricably linked, and where the emphasis of the question seemed to be more on the idea than on the specific word.
Sep
7
answered Origin of “bug” in reference to software
Jul
31
answered A person who travels from place to place without good reason
Jul
22
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
21
comment What is meant by “don't piss on my boots and tell me it's raining”?
@MrHen: Removing the references to the idomatic meaning of "piss" will (IMO) simplify and clarify your answer. I'd remove the love triangle, too -- "pissing" as in "a pissing match" involves competing, whereas the phrase at hand basically means "don't lie to my face."
Jul
21
answered Gender neutral reflexive pronoun — equivalent to “himself” and “herself”
Jul
21
comment What is meant by “don't piss on my boots and tell me it's raining”?
@MrHen, your first paragraph might lead one to think that you could substitute "insult me" for "piss on my boots", but "don't insult me and call it rain" makes no sense. It's the literal sense of "piss" and not the idiomatic one that's in play here because the parallel between urine and rain is what makes the metaphor work. It's true that no real urination need take place because the entire phrase is a metaphor (likewise, the speaker need not wear real boots), but the phrase invokes an image of urine, not just insult.
Jul
21
comment What is meant by “don't piss on my boots and tell me it's raining”?
I think your first paragraph is incorrect. The entire phrase is a metaphor, but a a literal understanding of "piss" is required to make sense of the metaphor.
Jul
20
answered What is the meaning of “don't mention it” (in response to “thank you”)?
Jul
5
awarded  Critic
Jul
3
answered Why names such as Hastings-on-Hudson?
Jul
2
answered Synonym or short phrase for 'entablature'
Jul
2
answered In “Enter John”, is John in the nominative or accusative case?
Jul
2
comment “When” vs. “what time”
"What time" avoids potentially troublesome answers, like "When you've finished painting the house" or "When Hell freezes over."
Jul
2
awarded  Editor
Jul
2
comment Single word to denote date and time
@user93422, true, but "date and time" also identifies a particular minute or even second. For the purpose you described, I think "date" is the best option.