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Nov
19
answered Should one stick to American style of placing punctuation marks within quotes if one uses the American spelling?
Nov
4
revised Is “reblog” a word?
added 593 characters in body
Nov
4
answered Is “reblog” a word?
Oct
30
comment Is there a synonym for “defenestrate”?
@JeffSahol, the physical reality is that defenestration will always be easier and more reliable than the opposite maneuver, but I think we could coin infenestrate, as in: I didn't intend to infenestrate the baseball, but Dad still docked my allowance to pay for the repair.
Oct
28
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
To beg the question a bit, I don't think widely implies regularity, so if widely can mean large and irregular, how is that different from wildly? Widely could mean "large but in control" and wildly could mean "out of control," but I have a strong suspicion that very few people think in terms of statistical control when they use these terms.
Oct
28
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
+1 for a great answer, and especially for the edit. I agree with @Jefromi -- wildly is not a word I'd choose for small σ.
Oct
27
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
27
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
I'd expect both to indicate large standard deviation, but wildly to imply more randomness. A high amplitude sine wave might fluctuate widely but not wildly. However, I don't think it's safe to read much more than "it changes a lot" into most uses of either phrase.
Oct
27
awarded  Student
Oct
27
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
That'd be my expectation as an American, too. I was very surprised to see the opposite in the ngram.
Oct
27
asked “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
Oct
24
answered Is “It comes with a hitch” an idiom or a simple statement?
Oct
14
comment Word for someone who collects dice
@NickWiggill, details, details...
Oct
12
comment What do we call the GUI “box” which groups elements together?
@Pacerier, the point is that context matters. If you're writing a user manual for laymen, say "box" or "section" or "group box" because those terms are fairly descriptive. If you're talking to a UI designer or programmer familiar with the Windows API, use "group". If you're talking to programmers who are likely to be familiar with GUI development but might not know Windows API specifically, say "pane," "view," or "window."
Oct
12
answered What do we call the GUI “box” which groups elements together?
Oct
8
revised What is the demonym for Norfolk, Virginia?
Added Virginia after first mention of Norfolk just to clarify which Norfolk is being discussed.
Oct
8
suggested approved edit on What is the demonym for Norfolk, Virginia?
Oct
8
comment What is the demonym for Norfolk, Virginia?
@Noldorin, this answer relates to Norfolk, Virginia. (It's fairly apparent, since the question asks about Norfolk, Va. Also, Hampton Roads and Tidewater are both in the Norfolk, Va. area.)
Oct
6
answered A word for a worldly wise person who pretends to be naïve?
Sep
27
comment Plurality of “genitals”
@Phoenix: How about "new development" or "new story"? News is, after all, just the plural of new.