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Aug
7
comment Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
@PeterShor Sometimes we say in 15 minutes' time, i.e. "in the time of 15 minutes." In that case, minutes is a noun. waits of 15 minutes duration seems like an attempt at the same sort of formation, so perhaps minutes should possessive there, but duration is redundant. I'd suggest 15 minutes' wait or wait of 15 minutes instead.
Aug
7
comment Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
Added hyphens. I don't know if it's incorrect to leave them out, but it's certainly not incorrect to put them in. I was just thinking more about the words.
Aug
7
revised Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
edited body
Aug
7
answered Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
Jul
26
awarded  Caucus
Jul
19
comment Is there a different understanding of “rubber” in British and American English?
As an American, I haven't heard anyone use "rubber" for "condom" in twenty years. I expect that many Americans would understand it in context, but for most of us I think "condom" is nearly as far down the list of possible definitions of "rubber" as "eraser" would be.
Apr
16
answered Single word for “humorous in an intellectual way”
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
comment Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?
@JR. Fundamentally, there's a conflict between two definitions of the same word. Given Y is X, X sometimes means all X's and other times means some X that's not Y. When the distinction between X and Y is strong enough, people will start objecting if you use X in place of Y. A tomato is technically a kind of fruit, but people will object in some contexts if you call a tomato a fruit instead of a vegetable.
Mar
15
answered Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?
Mar
13
comment Name for words created from mispronunciations?
@FumbleFingers That's the only way that I can think of to spell the way it sounds -- essentially the first syllable of casual. I have to admit that I haven't seen it either -- but this process of spoken words being written down and growing into part of the language is what I was thinking about.
Mar
13
comment Name for words created from mispronunciations?
@nohat Thanks, I didn't know that. am not, are not, is not... all forms of to be, or, not to be. ;-)
Mar
13
asked Name for words created from mispronunciations?
Mar
9
answered Expression “let's cross that bridge a little further down the road”
Feb
24
answered What is the correct form of address for a police officer?
Jan
31
awarded  Quorum
Jan
13
comment Colorful term for someone with a long-overdue library book
That's a lot of alliteration.
Jan
12
answered Colorful term for someone with a long-overdue library book
Nov
19
comment Should one stick to American style of placing punctuation marks within quotes if one uses the American spelling?
@PeterShor Good call, thanks. Updated answer.
Nov
19
revised Should one stick to American style of placing punctuation marks within quotes if one uses the American spelling?
deleted 23 characters in body