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visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Jul 11 at 10:31

profile for Caleb on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


You: Do you know Jon Skeet?

Expert: I once tried to convince the community, it worked remarkably well.

You: Do you know Joel Spolsky?

Expert: I know joel spolsky to a certain degree at least.

You: Does he treat you well?

Expert: :)

You: What is it like to work at Stack Exchange?

Expert: The answer is pretty complicated.

You: I'm listening.

Expert: I used to know someone who was listening.


Mar
15
answered Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?
Mar
13
comment Name for words created from mispronunciations?
@FumbleFingers That's the only way that I can think of to spell the way it sounds -- essentially the first syllable of casual. I have to admit that I haven't seen it either -- but this process of spoken words being written down and growing into part of the language is what I was thinking about.
Mar
13
comment Name for words created from mispronunciations?
@nohat Thanks, I didn't know that. am not, are not, is not... all forms of to be, or, not to be. ;-)
Mar
13
asked Name for words created from mispronunciations?
Mar
9
answered Expression “let's cross that bridge a little further down the road”
Feb
24
answered What is the correct form of address for a police officer?
Jan
31
awarded  Quorum
Jan
13
comment Colorful term for someone with a long-overdue library book
That's a lot of alliteration.
Jan
12
answered Colorful term for someone with a long-overdue library book
Nov
19
comment Should one stick to American style of placing punctuation marks within quotes if one uses the American spelling?
@PeterShor Good call, thanks. Updated answer.
Nov
19
revised Should one stick to American style of placing punctuation marks within quotes if one uses the American spelling?
deleted 23 characters in body
Nov
19
answered Should one stick to American style of placing punctuation marks within quotes if one uses the American spelling?
Nov
4
revised Is “reblog” a word?
added 593 characters in body
Nov
4
answered Is “reblog” a word?
Oct
30
comment Is there a synonym for “defenestrate”?
@JeffSahol, the physical reality is that defenestration will always be easier and more reliable than the opposite maneuver, but I think we could coin infenestrate, as in: I didn't intend to infenestrate the baseball, but Dad still docked my allowance to pay for the repair.
Oct
28
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
To beg the question a bit, I don't think widely implies regularity, so if widely can mean large and irregular, how is that different from wildly? Widely could mean "large but in control" and wildly could mean "out of control," but I have a strong suspicion that very few people think in terms of statistical control when they use these terms.
Oct
28
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
+1 for a great answer, and especially for the edit. I agree with @Jefromi -- wildly is not a word I'd choose for small σ.
Oct
27
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
27
comment “Fluctuates widely” or “fluctuates wildly”
I'd expect both to indicate large standard deviation, but wildly to imply more randomness. A high amplitude sine wave might fluctuate widely but not wildly. However, I don't think it's safe to read much more than "it changes a lot" into most uses of either phrase.
Oct
27
awarded  Student