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Dec
1
comment Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
@FumbleFingers I don't think this is a dupe of the linked question at all. This Q relates to a particular construction whereas the linked Q is about something else entirely. They do both deal with personal pronouns, but they're not the same question.
Dec
1
comment Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
Great answer -- thanks so much!
Dec
1
awarded  Scholar
Dec
1
accepted Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
Nov
30
comment Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
Seems to make more sense with get; nobody would question I'm going to get myself some dinner, and it's easy to see me being substituted for myself.
Nov
30
asked Reflexive love: where does “love me some …” come from?
Oct
27
awarded  Enlightened
Oct
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
23
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
19
comment Word for someone who collects dice
@tchrist It's meant to be a humorous term, but I didn't offer this answer simply as a joke. The set of amusing answer and the set of "real" answers do occasionally intersect.
Aug
19
comment Word for someone who collects dice
@tchrist Mine may not be the answer, but it's certainly an answer. The OP doesn't specify the context, and a tongue-in-cheek term may be helpful, if not to the OP then perhaps to a future reader. The question asks for a term, and I offered one. I'm not asking for clarification -- I don't understand why you think this should be a comment.
Aug
9
answered What does the phrase “50% premium” mean?
Aug
8
comment Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
@Luke There are a lot of English speakers out there, and they don't all play by the same rules. Perhaps there are regions where 15 minutes waits is acceptable or even the norm. That said, I believe the phrase would be considered ungrammatical according to the normal rules of American English.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
@tchrist Surely the most widely-known Favre is Brett Favre, the "NFL's All-Time Winningest Quarterback." Clearly, though, the pronunciation of his name is an exception.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
@tchrist When you write them that way, they're not pronounceable at all! ;-) I take your point about syllabic consonants, and I think it's basically the right answer, but to us non-linguists it does seem like the letters are inverted.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
I think you're wrong on Favre -- it's always pronounced by sports commentators with the r before the v: Farve. I noted some other examples in my comment on the question. The OP's examples aren't good ones, but there are some words where letters seem to be pronounced out of order.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
The best example I can think of is iron, which is usually pronounced (at least in the US) as though it were spelled iorn. Another is choir, which is pronounced kwy-or, i.e. with the i before the or.
Aug
8
revised “Tip” or “tips” of your fingers?
added 250 characters in body
Aug
8
answered “Tip” or “tips” of your fingers?
Aug
7
comment “In orbit” vs. “on orbit”
+1 Excellent description. You could make it even better, though, by including a reference.