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visits member for 3 years
seen Dec 20 '13 at 14:17

profile for Caleb on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


You: Do you know Jon Skeet?

Expert: I once tried to convince the community, it worked remarkably well.

You: Do you know Joel Spolsky?

Expert: I know joel spolsky to a certain degree at least.

You: Does he treat you well?

Expert: :)

You: What is it like to work at Stack Exchange?

Expert: The answer is pretty complicated.

You: I'm listening.

Expert: I used to know someone who was listening.


Aug
9
answered What does the phrase “50% premium” mean?
Aug
8
comment Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
@Luke There are a lot of English speakers out there, and they don't all play by the same rules. Perhaps there are regions where 15 minutes waits is acceptable or even the norm. That said, I believe the phrase would be considered ungrammatical according to the normal rules of American English.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
@tchrist Surely the most widely-known Favre is Brett Favre, the "NFL's All-Time Winningest Quarterback." Clearly, though, the pronunciation of his name is an exception.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
@tchrist When you write them that way, they're not pronounceable at all! ;-) I take your point about syllabic consonants, and I think it's basically the right answer, but to us non-linguists it does seem like the letters are inverted.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
I think you're wrong on Favre -- it's always pronounced by sports commentators with the r before the v: Farve. I noted some other examples in my comment on the question. The OP's examples aren't good ones, but there are some words where letters seem to be pronounced out of order.
Aug
8
comment words pronounced with their letters reversed
The best example I can think of is iron, which is usually pronounced (at least in the US) as though it were spelled iorn. Another is choir, which is pronounced kwy-or, i.e. with the i before the or.
Aug
8
revised “Tip” or “tips” of your fingers?
added 250 characters in body
Aug
8
answered “Tip” or “tips” of your fingers?
Aug
7
comment “In orbit” vs. “on orbit”
+1 Excellent description. You could make it even better, though, by including a reference.
Aug
7
comment Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
@PeterShor Sometimes we say in 15 minutes' time, i.e. "in the time of 15 minutes." In that case, minutes is a noun. waits of 15 minutes duration seems like an attempt at the same sort of formation, so perhaps minutes should possessive there, but duration is redundant. I'd suggest 15 minutes' wait or wait of 15 minutes instead.
Aug
7
comment Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
Added hyphens. I don't know if it's incorrect to leave them out, but it's certainly not incorrect to put them in. I was just thinking more about the words.
Aug
7
revised Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
edited body
Aug
7
answered Is “They all had 15 minutes waits” grammatically correct?
Jul
26
awarded  Caucus
Jul
19
comment Is there a different understanding of “rubber” in British and American English?
As an American, I haven't heard anyone use "rubber" for "condom" in twenty years. I expect that many Americans would understand it in context, but for most of us I think "condom" is nearly as far down the list of possible definitions of "rubber" as "eraser" would be.
Apr
16
answered Single word for “humorous in an intellectual way”
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
comment Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?
@JR. Fundamentally, there's a conflict between two definitions of the same word. Given Y is X, X sometimes means all X's and other times means some X that's not Y. When the distinction between X and Y is strong enough, people will start objecting if you use X in place of Y. A tomato is technically a kind of fruit, but people will object in some contexts if you call a tomato a fruit instead of a vegetable.
Mar
15
answered Is it acceptable to call a hot dog a sausage?
Mar
13
comment Name for words created from mispronunciations?
@FumbleFingers That's the only way that I can think of to spell the way it sounds -- essentially the first syllable of casual. I have to admit that I haven't seen it either -- but this process of spoken words being written down and growing into part of the language is what I was thinking about.