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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Sep 8 at 19:39

profile for Caleb on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


You: Do you know Jon Skeet?

Expert: I once tried to convince the community, it worked remarkably well.

You: Do you know Joel Spolsky?

Expert: I know joel spolsky to a certain degree at least.

You: Does he treat you well?

Expert: :)

You: What is it like to work at Stack Exchange?

Expert: The answer is pretty complicated.

You: I'm listening.

Expert: I used to know someone who was listening.


Aug
23
comment Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?
Followed by: but is there an actual word which does that? The question could use some work.
Aug
22
comment Is there a word which means whatever you want it to mean? Or has no meaning?
That is a pronoun, so it's true that it's job is to take the place of a noun, but it's always used with an antecedent or at least some sort of (possibly nonverbal) indication of what the speaker intends to refer to. In this question the OP seems to be asking for a placeholder word that can be used without indicating its meaning. Also, that in He looked like that is still a pronoun, not an adjective.
Aug
19
awarded  Notable Question
Jun
17
awarded  Constituent
Jun
9
awarded  Caucus
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Apr
3
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
8
comment What vivid verb should I use when someone “turns into” a zombie?
Someone who matures or evolves into a zombie isn't starting from a very good place -- those words generally connote a positive change. Devolves would be a better choice to describe most people undergoing zombification, although there are certainly exceptions.
Nov
4
comment Word or phrase for “seeing meaning where none exists”
Meaning exists where we find it. If a reader finds meaning that the author didn't intend, who's to say that it doesn't exist?
Oct
31
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
26
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
10
awarded  Cleanup
Aug
10
revised Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?
rolled back to a previous revision
Aug
10
comment Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?
@JanusBahsJacquet That's what I wrote, in fact, but someone missed my point and edited my answer. :-)
Aug
9
answered Alternative to the incorrect “I'm doing great”?
Jul
16
comment Revealing that someone else is gay — counterpart to “come out”
outed isn't specific to revealing sexual preference. It's often used that way and has that connotation in many contexts, but it can refer to the revelation of any secret identity. For example: J.K. Rowling was recently outed as the author of _Cuckoo's Calling_. (I'm not disagreeing with p.s.w.g here, just trying to clarify.)
Jun
20
comment Is a “doozy” a good or bad thing?
Wiktionary seems to rely on World Wide Words:Doozy for this information. IMO, it's silly to discount the influence of Duesenberg automobiles, too. The Duesenberg name may not have been the genesis of the term doozy, but the Duesie nickname may have reinforced the meaning and made the term even more common. It's been quite a while since I read it, but I think I remember a reference to Duesenberg as a source for doozy in The Great Cars.
Jun
20
answered Is there a Latin, or English, phrase or acronym for “in summary”?
May
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling