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Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Mar
15
comment All I know vs. Alls I know
Can you provide some evidence for this, or are you just guessing? Was all as I know ever a common phrase?
Mar
15
answered What is the name of the glyph that separates sections of a chapter?
Mar
5
comment Is there any word in English where “th” sounds like “t+h”?
@AmI Afrikaans is derived from Dutch, so no surprise there.
Mar
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
4
answered Is there any word in English where “th” sounds like “t+h”?
Feb
8
comment Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
@AleksandarĐorđević That's perfectly fine. You can say Life is better with a pet, and we'll all understand that you mean a cat, a dog, etc. But you probably don't mean to exclude cases where someone has both a dog and a cat, or two dogs, etc., and as a native AmE speaker I think it's unlikely that anyone in that situation would feel excluded. You could also think of your cat and her dog at the same time, and say Life is better with pets, and again the statement is sufficiently general that nobody who only owns one pet will feel slighted. In short: it works either way.
Feb
8
answered Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
Feb
7
comment Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
Nobody would infer that multiple pets are required for a better life from life is better with pets.
Feb
7
comment Proper use in singular: Life is better with a pet or a dog or pets?
Either one really works fine, unless your study finds specifically that owning more than one pet is a benefit.
Jan
30
comment English equivalent for “Picking a fight with your mother because you lost a fight at the marketplace.”
American version: get one's panties in a wad/knot.
Jan
29
comment What do you call a unit of beer within a pack?
Easily misunderstood in the world of distribution. You could ask someone to get you one container and end up with a giant steel box.
Jan
19
comment Word or phrase for “it won't change anything, but we'll protest anyways”
This phrase strongly connotes continuing to do something after it has become futile; you wouldn't use it if the situation were hopeless at the outset.
Jan
19
comment Word or phrase for “it won't change anything, but we'll protest anyways”
Sisyphean is the best answer, IMO. Maybe it's just my interpretation, but I always think of "pissing into the wind" to have an element of backfiring: if you try it, you end up covered in piss. Howling at the wind might convey the sense of futility without the adverse consequence. Sting wrote it's like singing in the wind or writing on the surface of a lake, but he stole that from Catullus.
Oct
14
comment Who would address the issue this fall?
I'm not convinced that it's necessary to characterize the announcement as either ironic or cynical. Any meaningful reduction in carbon emission must be lead by China and the US because they're the largest emitters. And in any case, the political commentary doesn't contribute anything to the OP's understanding of sentence structure.
Jul
31
comment Word for a room with washing machines in it?
@Sawbones That's true in the context of a commercial or apartment building where there might actually be a janitor, but a 'utility room' in a house or apartment is typically a space with water heater, washer/dryer, HVAC, etc.
Apr
11
awarded  Yearling
Dec
16
comment “Off the wall” vs. “Off of the wall”
@KristinaLopez Here's one that suggests that: etymonline.com/…
Dec
16
revised What is the netting dressing for a deep cut called?
added 465 characters in body
Dec
16
revised What is the netting dressing for a deep cut called?
added 465 characters in body