489 reputation
24
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen Oct 13 at 14:38

Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Jan
26
answered Does “nineteen-hundreds” refer to 1900–1909 or 1900–1999?
Jan
4
comment What does “new normal” mean?
@Merk I would argue in this case that the punctuation of the original quote is flawed. "New normal" should not be placed in quotes at all, and the author simply did so [erroneously] to visually join the two words into a single term. The quote should have read: "Agile Development and Service-Oriented-Architectures (SOA) represent the new normal." Misuse of quotation marks is very common even in professional writing, especially when invoking new language. The punctuation may mess up the syntax and semantics in a strict sense, but punctuation is seldom consistent with new idioms and phrases.
Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
22
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
29
answered Is “I can't go on, I'll go on” an idiom or not?
Jun
29
comment A Semi-Independent Chapter (of an organization)
"Less strongly" than what? Are we comparing this to existing subsidiaries or something? What language do they use?
Jun
4
comment How to pronounce GUID
I've heard it pronounced with in the same four ways in Michigan, US, and Arizona, US. Popularity IMX seems to be 3., 2., 1., 4.
May
24
comment What does “high” add to the meaning of this sentence of Tagore's poem?
If this is a poem, shouldn't the meaning be entirely up to the reader?
May
23
answered Pronunciation of “cache”
May
21
awarded  Commentator
May
21
comment Ones or one's: Which is the correct usage?
@Erik @Karl @user9325 I'm going to have to go look this up some more. I've been taught by several teachers that 'ones' as a pronoun is explicitly wrong, but clearly that's not the case.
May
21
comment Ones or one's: Which is the correct usage?
@user9325 Fair enough. Almost always incorrect. It would have to refer to a multitude of singular objects which are called a "one", which is a somewhat unusual case. Still, I'm not convinced it's not incorrect. "Frightened people" would be more correct. It's not like Roger Waters was an Oxford professor. The only other case I can thing of is when 'one' is the name of the object, i.e., "four ones" for four one-dollar bills.
May
21
answered Usage of “not comparable”
May
21
comment Ones or one's: Which is the correct usage?
Note also that "ones" is always incorrect, because a noun with an explicit singular meaning should not be pluralized. "Ones" would be similar to "Is" instead of "us," or "yous," "hes," or "shes," instead of "them."
May
21
answered Word for whether a product is genuine or sham
May
14
answered How does one correctly use a semicolon?
May
14
answered What are some slang words for “police” in countries besides the US?
May
14
comment Using “to” twice in a row
I would generally phrase the sentence "Who should I talk to in order to learn about that?" simply to avoid the repetition.
May
12
answered Differences between “coordinate” (n.) and “co-ordinate” (n.)