Reputation
719
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
4 8
Newest
 Yearling
Impact
~87k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 62 votes cast
Jun
6
answered Small word to describe the purpose or status of some data
Aug
25
comment What's the difference in meaning between “I never would have thought…” and “I never have thought…”?
@Jakob "would never" and "never would" mean the same thing.
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Aug
5
awarded  Notable Question
Apr
9
awarded  Yearling
Dec
21
comment In natural disasters: died or killed?
Or, Everyone perished.
Dec
18
answered The difference between an analogy and a metaphor?
Nov
19
comment When can an adjective be postposed?
@Kris, No, I can't as I wasn't relying on a source. That's why I posted my suggestion as a comment.
Nov
19
comment When can an adjective be postposed?
The adjective can be postponed if it is the sole or principle descriptive term needed to understand a plural (or non-singular) category. e.g. matters mathematical courts martial inspectors general
Nov
14
answered Generic terms for people on opposite sides of a transaction
Nov
10
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
6
comment Scripts ran/run/running/?
Perhaps, but then my whole point was that run is probably not the best word to use here.
Nov
6
answered Scripts ran/run/running/?
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Jan
22
awarded  Commentator
Jan
22
comment Is 'petrichor' the only noun in English that means a specific scent?
@BigDogg More accurately, the page says Geosmin, which literally translates to "earth smell", is an organic compound.
Jan
22
answered Is 'petrichor' the only noun in English that means a specific scent?
Dec
2
comment What does the phrase “You're out of your element” mean?
+1 "A fish out of water" is a great example of the literal and intended meaning.
Dec
2
answered What does the phrase “You're out of your element” mean?
Dec
2
answered Is there a formal term for “snail mail”?