1,580 reputation
46
bio website radio.javaranch.com/michael
location California
age
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Aug 18 '13 at 22:57

May
18
comment What's the meaning for 'de' in “Tour de France”?
Sometimes the right flair is the best answer. :-D
May
4
comment Are “act quickly” and “gives you” grammatically correct?
"Provides" is a better choice, but the verb is so overused in technical documentation I'd prefer to read almost anything else that's close.
May
3
comment Difference in usage of “regular”, “usual”, “ordinary”, “normal”, “common”
@NickAldwin I might be in favor of no one having to order that.
May
2
comment Difference in usage of “regular”, “usual”, “ordinary”, “normal”, “common”
And some restaurants use the term "still water." Sometimes I will say "tap water" just to see if it makes them squirm.
May
1
comment What is a good synonym for “badass” that would be usable in a high school setting?
@Loquacity: I had awesome in my list, then decided it didn't have the edge that @NReilingh was looking to keep.
May
1
comment Article written “in” or “on” a journal?
@Wes - The idea of writing about a journal reminded me of a joke, as in "I'd like to talk more about a conversation later."
Apr
30
comment Article written “in” or “on” a journal?
@Wes - we can talk more about this conversation later. ;-)
Apr
26
comment Does the phrase “second off” make sense?
Google results stuff the ballot box. Even so, the drop to "second-off" is more than one order of magnitude. That's helpful when determining a proper ration of black and red ink to keep on hand, I suppose...
Apr
26
comment “Environmentally-friendly” vs. “Environment-friendly”
When you start seeing "environment-friendly" on any number of American products, you'll see my point. Sorry you didn't find this helpful.
Apr
23
comment “Some champagne for my real friends, some real pain for my sham friends.”
The people who mind don't matter; the people who matter don't mind.
Apr
22
comment A single word meaning doubt and unsettledness
"Qualm" is an awesome word. I consider my suggestion checkmated.
Apr
21
comment Common usage of “namely”
Pretty much that: to specify. As a matter of speech, it allows you to add emphasis by placing the named subject at the end of a sentence. Consider the tone of "the engineering students cause a lot of trouble" against "some students cause a lot of trouble, namely the engineering students."
Apr
21
comment Plural contraction in a very specific case: Which is correct?
Doh, right you are.
Apr
20
comment Plural contraction in a very specific case: Which is correct?
No idea what an "invariable presentational" is, but "there's cookies" in the US is less common than "there's some cookies" and "there's a bunch of cookies," both of which preserve plural agreement.
Apr
17
comment A word that sounds like “scoshe” meaning “small amount” or “smidgen”
Search on "skosh"
Apr
16
comment Is there a word for “Someone who/Something that caches”?
Pirate! Yarrr...
Apr
16
comment English phrases created or popularized through Seinfeld
Your example is also part of a running gag. There's also had a high-talker and quiet-talker bit. Observational humor relies on pointing out small oddities that we notice in others but don't always talk about. In the early seasons, the show opened and ended with such an observation that related to the episodes. As it progressed, it seems to me they weaved them in on more levels into the story itself. The grand metaphor to it all, the Show About Nothing,
Apr
16
comment Is “kicking ass and taking names” an offshoot of an older idiom?
Seems to me it's a variation. On police dealing with dangerous criminals -- or perhaps overzealous police -- there's the expression "shoot first, question the pieces later."
Apr
15
comment Is the conditional a mood or a tense?
Divining a mood from hypothetical situations seems to me an exercise in creating categories for their own sake.
Apr
15
comment Résumé section about myself
"Personal" or "Interests" are also common in my part of the U.S.