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Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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Apr
23
comment Origin of the “Rule of thumb” phrase
True -- Only the Romans could invent the trivia.
Apr
23
comment Origin of the “Rule of thumb” phrase
Heh, I'm not too concerned about the down vote. However, I appended an update, to highlight your comment. You are very perceptive, to have caught the "thumb" reference.
Apr
23
revised Origin of the “Rule of thumb” phrase
Specified the rule of thumb is undocumented and an oral tradition, and why it is said in English and not Latin. Made a couple of other grammatical and formatting corrections.
Apr
23
comment Origin of the “Rule of thumb” phrase
@Nathan - I'm pretty sure they did not use the literal word "thumb". You'll likely find "pollux regula", if anything.
Apr
8
awarded  Yearling
Sep
30
awarded  Peer Pressure
Sep
27
comment “Not hindered with any knowledge”
I tip my hat to you, sir. I have been writing for English-ignorant readers, for far too long. I recently overheard someone say, "Those [foreigners] gotta learn to speak American." Sigh
Sep
27
comment “Not hindered with any knowledge”
"Unhindered by knowledge" is probably a better phrase -- it's easier to say and more direct. Perhaps, "inexperienced with".
Sep
22
answered Origin of the “Rule of thumb” phrase
Sep
22
accepted Proper Apostrophe Usage with Initialisms: CCS' or CCS's?
Sep
22
revised Proper Apostrophe Usage with Initialisms: CCS' or CCS's?
Added update to illustrate plurality
Sep
22
answered One for the money, two for the show
Sep
22
comment Proper Apostrophe Usage with Initialisms: CCS' or CCS's?
@aedia λ - Incitentally, I also came across Common Errors in English Usage -- Acronyms and Apostrophes