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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 108 votes cast
Jul
1
comment “make it to there”
@EdwinAshworth Ahh see now you are making a constructive point. That is a case I didn't consider. The "to" can be used emphasise the distance. I wonder what rules govern that case.
Jun
30
comment “make it to there”
It's not ungrammatical in that it is still intelligible, but it is not standard English, "can you make it to here by five o'clock" sounds like Singlish or something similar.
Dec
6
comment Feeling like something impossible or paranormal is happening
Well .. there should be a word for it :p
Jun
6
comment What is the antonym of register?
@Fumble @Ham Downvoting increases the downvotee's rep. I see that a question or answer has has been downvoted and I give it a vote just to spite the downvoter :p Wonder if i'm alone in that. +1 to question and answer.
Jun
1
comment A night without sleeping
In Australian English we also use to pull an all-nighter, meaning to work (on a project) all night.
May
30
comment Is saying “shit happens” ok?
@Dmitry, certainly in Australia it would be a political mistake to brush off a soldiers death no-matter which words you chose. That is more of a political issue than a language issue though.
May
27
comment What does “it’s not going to suck itself ” mean?
not sure if serious
May
27
comment Depression and happiness
@FumbleFingers i.e. "Too hard, I won't bother trying."
May
27
comment Why do non-native English speakers get the present participle wrong?
This needs a tl;dr
May
24
comment English word for a contest where participants collect items
I think you mean incidentally collect tokens?
May
24
comment Is there a word for a person with only one head?
@F'x : Ahh, good info.
May
23
comment Is there a way to transform “found” to stand for “things which have been found”?
yes. "Things have been found" is a statement. "Things which have been found" is a noun-phrase.
May
23
comment Is there a way to transform “found” to stand for “things which have been found”?
@z7sg ahh yes another good one.. I think the plural of that noun is actually finds. I'll add it to the answer.
May
23
comment Is there a straightforward word for “The thing in between first and second”?
OP's comment "For positive integral orders, we have words in English (first, second, third...). I just want to know if there is a word for "3/2 st"." :p
May
23
comment Is there a straightforward word for “The thing in between first and second”?
@Boob @Glen it actually makes perfect sense for sequences to be limited to positive integers as you can't really succeed by less than one. The one-and-a-halfth place implies concurrency with the first and second place which destroys the ordered aspect of the list.
May
23
comment Is there a straightforward word for “The thing in between first and second”?
Not indicative of ordinal place
May
23
comment Is there a straightforward word for “The thing in between first and second”?
@Boob +1 repost this as an answer; this is the correct answer.
May
23
comment Is there a way to transform “found” to stand for “things which have been found”?
对不起, I think you might mean "things which have been found" and "things which belong to you"
May
21
comment The history of the use of “man”
+1 because I think people are too eager to downvote
May
21
comment The history of the use of “man”
@Brian Hooper @nohat @FumbleFingers @Third Idiot. This needed editing NOT closing. It is actually a reasonable question. Some people are too quick to downvote / close threads, it seems arrogant.