276 reputation
29
bio website
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 49
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Jul 15 at 9:35
Not a programmer but not afraid to use simple programming / macroing such as manipulate and analyze data in R or write 3-10 line autohotkey commands.

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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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accepted Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?
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awarded  Commentator
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comment Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?
@WarrenP Where do you live? Which phrase have you not heard for the past 20 years?
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awarded  Nice Question
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awarded  Yearling
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asked Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?
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awarded  Nice Question
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comment “Bring” versus “take”
@opinion I wish to correct you. The original meaning has only been lost in American English. I can tell you that the difference still exists in South African English.
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awarded  Scholar
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accepted “Bring” vs. “take” in American English
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comment “Bring” vs. “take” in American English
Indeed. I am not going to singlehandedly change 330 million to the rest of the English-speaking world's restrictive use of "bring." Instead, I want to know when American English lost the differentiation. When did "bring" begin to mean both "bring" and "take"?
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comment “Bring” vs. “take” in American English
Let me guess. ShreevatsaR did not live in the USA when he/she was about 10 years old and nohat did live in the USA when he/she was 10 years old.
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awarded  Critic
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awarded  Supporter
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comment “Bring” vs. “take” in American English
Your answer seems plausible but I do not know if it is correct.
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comment “Bring” vs. “take” in American English
Cont. from 2 above. Erik said "I am going to bring him to the OR." That meant that Erik was in the OR. What was he still doing there? Had there been complications closing the incision? How could Erik adequately asses the need for tracheotomy if he had not seen the patient in Emergency (ER)? If Erik had already been to the ER why did he leave the patient? Erik should transport the ER patient. I asked him why he, Erik, was in the OR. He corrected me and told me he was in the ER. "Didn't you say you were going to BRING the patient to the OR?". "Yes", he replied. This went on a bit
Sep
18
comment “Bring” vs. “take” in American English
Another example of confusion: Our next door neighbors came for supper. As it got late their little daughters became cranky and and then one of them defecated in her diaper which stank the house out. This happened while I and the father were in the midst of an important discussion. My friend picked up his daughter, made a reference to the odor and told me "I need to change her.", while he pointed to his house across the garden. "I am going to bring her back". Well, what did that mean? BRING her back meant to return notwithstanding the late hour, which is not what he meant vs. "Take her back".