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13h
revised Phrase to mean “fully prepared”
deleted 37 characters in body
13h
comment Phrase to mean “fully prepared”
If you want a phrase that means fully prepared, then "fully prepared" would seem to fit the bill. Is there some other requirement you need to satisfy?
1d
answered greatest or largest number
2d
answered What is a good word for a lack of knowledge on a particular subject matter?
2d
comment what does 'swing your other leg over' mean?
Possibly this? urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=leg+over
2d
comment “Donation” or “donations”?
I don't think there is anything to indicate that one donation means money, whereas many donations means other stuff.
May
25
revised Antonym of test run
added 1 character in body
May
25
revised What does it mean to be the Louis Kirstein Professor?
added 1 character in body
May
25
comment Is there any saying or idiom to describe the opposite of “blessing in disguise”?
The example you quote is not the opposite of a 'blessing in disguise'. A blessing in disguise is when something seeming bad happens but it turns out to be good. In this example something bad happened - a car service didn't show up - and it turned out to be worse.
May
25
comment A Proper Answer to “Hello, I'm Dr. Stephen Newdell, How do you do?”
Hi Stephen. Please can you have a look at The Tour and other help pages which will explain what this site is about? Specifically we are dedicated to answering factual, specific questions about English Language usage, rather than for chat or discussion. This means that your question here is off topic and will probably be closed. Feel free to stick around and ask and answer factual questions.
May
25
answered What does it mean to be the Louis Kirstein Professor?
May
24
answered Antonym of test run
May
23
comment Em dashes or ellipsis over multiple paragraphs
We don't really do literary feedback here, but that wasn't what came across to me.
May
22
answered Quotation marks and italics in same sentence
May
22
comment Quotation marks and italics in same sentence
While Dies Irae is the title of the poem, and also the title of the settings of it that appear in a requiem, it seems to be being used here not as a title, but to meany a particular kind of musical piece (i.e. a setting of the poem). The indefinite article is a good indicator of this. Since it isn't a title I don't believe it deserves italics.
May
22
comment phrase from a play by Terence: “ne quid nimis”
This is actually Latin, not English. There is a proposal for a Latin language site, but I'm afraid it's not running yet.
May
22
revised Does it make sense, when asked whether you're finished eating, to answer “Thank you”?
edited title
May
22
comment Em dashes or ellipsis over multiple paragraphs
Ellipses are used to indicate missing parts of a quote. in this case there are so many missing parts that the fact it is a quote seems irrelevant. Why not omit the ellipses and write in your own words? "<Something> said that the next year will tell whether Joe, his father, and the girl with the secret past can work together to solve the mystery to be destroyed by it."
May
22
comment Quotation marks and italics in same sentence
Can you please paste all the text you are talking about, and put the quotes and italics in the places they appear. Please edit the question. (You can create italics using the "I" button above the question box)
May
22
revised Quotation marks and italics in same sentence
deleted 19 characters in body