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1h
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
Take this to chat if you want to discuss it more.
10h
revised What does “a bit of a tartar” mean?
added 22 characters in body
11h
answered “would like to see being removed” or “would like to be seen removed”?
14h
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
@gelolopez gives a good answer.
14h
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
If you want to know more about this, feel free to start a chat room.
1d
answered What does “a bit of a tartar” mean?
1d
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
The OP asks what is meant in the passage quoted, and it's pretty obvious that it doesn't mean 'child abuse' in that passage.
1d
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
As was pointed out to Hans Adler, if you Google "corrective discipline" you will find all the top usages are in a workplace or tertiary education context describing "corrective discipline" for managers and administrators. They are not describing how to perform child abuse. There are people who beat children and call it 'corrective discipline", but it's an abuse of the term.
1d
comment Could we please meet in my office tomorrow
Hi. Please note that we have a site specifically for people learning English.. This question might be better there.
1d
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
@HotLicks No it's not, and actually reading the quote in the question would make that clear.
1d
comment What is “corrective discipline”?
'Corrective discipline' intended to be 'corrective', i.e. prevent some behaviour. 'Punishment' is retribution, which is very different.
2d
comment Name for a groom, in relation to the best man
Even if you found a word (let's say 'XXX'), it isn't going to be appropriate to refer to him as 'my XXX' in the future, because you can be best man to many grooms and thus have many XXXs. At best you are going to be able to call him 'one of my XXX', which frankly is no less complicated than "I was his best man".
2d
comment Name for a groom, in relation to the best man
Within the context of the wedding, referring to him as 'the groom' is appropriate, as weddings generally only have one.
Feb
2
comment What is the grammatical construction behind the word “climbing” in the phrase “climbing wall” or the word “running” in the phrase “running” shoes?
Feel free to explain grammatically why a climbing wall is different from a climbing plant, and running shoes different from running water.
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
This seems to be the reverse of what the question is asking.
Jan
29
comment Is there a similar English phrase for this Tamil proverb - “Lavish outside home yet starving inside of it”?
This doesn't necessarily carry the implication of 'putting on a show'.
Jan
29
comment Passive version of “process” (verb)
If this is technical writing you may want to use the well-understood (though 'clunky') phrases suggested above rather than a smooth-sounding but less understandable alternative.
Jan
28
comment Word or shorter term for “Possibly delayed”, as in the capacity for unreliable timing
Both imply that the data is not updated (or not current) rather than it might not be updated.
Jan
28
answered “road” vs. “pavement” vs. “roadway” for French “chaussée” [road surface] in AmEng vernacular
Jan
26
comment Is “I will sleep you to bed” grammatically correct?
Please have a look at our English Language Learners site, which is better suited to quesions like this.