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Apr
3
awarded  Yearling
Apr
3
awarded  Notable Question
Aug
26
reviewed Edit Formal word for “gotten made”
Aug
26
revised Formal word for “gotten made”
Include text attribution, which was hidden in violation of the mod directive on meta about this
Aug
26
reviewed Approve Is it formal to use “If” in a business email
Aug
26
reviewed Edit Is there a word for making something or someone confess?
Aug
26
revised Is there a word for making something or someone confess?
Include text attribution, which was hidden in violation of the mod directive on meta about this
Aug
26
reviewed Approve How do you call someone whom you ship your product to?
Aug
20
answered Is the describer needed in 'not…but…" type constructions?
Aug
20
comment Is the describer needed in 'not…but…" type constructions?
I would say you need the 'his' but not the 'is'. That's basically because the 'is' comes before the 'not' in that sentence, but the 'his' comes after the 'not' in its sentence. You basically need to follow the syntax of what comes after 'not'.
Aug
20
reviewed Reject Has she heard it or not?
Aug
18
comment “Her whole family IS/ARE biologists”?
I strongly disagree with this being called a duplicate. Not familiar with the Meta system. Has this already been brought up sufficiently by anyone?
Aug
18
comment What is the difference between “X is needed” and “X is necessary”?
Definitely feels like context is important here, yes. In this case, they work the same way. In other cases, I can think of differences, but as @FumbleFingers says, that would likely be too broad.
Aug
18
comment “desert island” versus “deserted island”
I would definitely say that the action implied in the participle 'deserted' is important here.
Aug
18
comment “Wise man” vs. “wise guy”
I'd suggest that 'guy' is/was just more commonly used than 'man'. Therefore 'wise guy' would be used more than 'wise man', and thus it would be more susceptible to semantic change. As 'wise guy' was more and more commonly used sarcastically to imply the opposite, speakers would have no choice but to reach back and use the less colloquial 'wise man' to differentiate. All conjecture, of course.
Aug
18
answered Does “Can I have lunch with you?” imply I have something to talk about with that person?
Aug
18
comment what's a close synonym for “ sorted for Es and whiz”?
Feels to me worth pointing out that the questions seems somewhat self-contradictory. Can't really see what conversation you would need to formally/politely announce that you are carrying drugs. Hardly one for the grandparents at Sunday dinner!
Aug
18
comment How to write word “hashtagged” using “#” symbol? #ed, #'ed, #-ed?
Surely the # symbol only accounts for the 'hash' in hashtagged. Therefore, it would be correct to write something like "#-tagged". However, +1 @Oldcat!
Aug
17
comment “Rather !” as a reply: old-fashioned? Colloquial? Unusual?
BrE is often quite understated and uses a fair bit of litotes in its converstaional language. Rather feels very British to me, where I would expect an AmE speaker to more likely say something like "totally!", which is somewhat more overstated. (Apologies for American stereotyping).
Aug
15
awarded  word-choice