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visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Aug 6 at 6:18

Aug
17
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
19
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
2
awarded  Yearling
Apr
24
answered Hard real time in user space with preempt_rt patch
Apr
2
awarded  Yearling
Feb
3
comment How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?
@tchrist: you're right, "if I were" is imperfect (but probably just called "past" in English) and "if I had been" is pluperfect.
Jan
24
comment What do you call that sound uncouth people make by gurgling the snot in their sinuses?
@Marthaª: oh, I see! The sound I'm talking about it exactly the one you just described, but is there a word for it?
Jan
23
comment What do you call that sound uncouth people make by gurgling the snot in their sinuses?
This is a much better word than the underwhelming "snuffle". It is unfortunate that "snuffle" exists, otherwise we could introduce "snurgle" as a neologism.
Jan
23
accepted What do you call that sound uncouth people make by gurgling the snot in their sinuses?
Jan
23
comment What do you call that sound uncouth people make by gurgling the snot in their sinuses?
The definition shies away from describing the snot-gurgle which for me is the defining feature of this awful sound, but the reference to crying and a cold suggests that it actually refers to the same thing. It lacks the onomatopoeic value I was hoping for, but it seems this is the word in English.
Jan
23
asked What do you call that sound uncouth people make by gurgling the snot in their sinuses?
Oct
12
comment Etymology of “medicine” and its Native American usage
I was not suggesting that the term "medicine man" is directly descended from its distant PIE ancestor, or that the people who introduced it were aware of the etymology. Rather, it just happened by chance that this new coinage has a meaning which seems more appropriate in light of the etymology, and this is serendipitous precisely because the people who coined it were probably not aware of those roots.
Oct
11
comment Etymology of “medicine” and its Native American usage
@morphail: thanks for the downvote. I don't think you understood what I wrote.
Jul
8
answered What does “What price X?” mean?
Jul
7
comment “-ee” and “-er” word endings
"Dragee" sounds wrong to me. One, -ee is for people, as Jimi said; two, a person who drags is a "dragger", so one who is dragged would be a "draggee".
Jul
7
accepted Subject with multiple verbs
Jul
7
comment Subject with multiple verbs
Ah, that must have been the root of the objection. Thank you! I ended up rewriting the sentence like this, for better flow: In both cases, execution is asynchronous: the request is queued up and the caller continues running, while the command or event handler is executed on the same thread (the program’s only) at the next opportunity.
Jul
7
comment “Is key” or “is the key”?
BTW, "is the key" sounds closer to "the key solution" to me, while I just want to indicate an important aspect of the problem. Is my feeling right?
Jul
7
accepted “Is key” or “is the key”?
Jul
7
asked Subject with multiple verbs