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seen Mar 5 at 8:34

Dec
20
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
23
awarded  Scholar
Oct
23
accepted Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
Jan
20
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
14
awarded  Nice Question
Aug
24
comment “for” or “because”?
You could also drop the "because" or "for" thing and add a semicolon: "Mackenzie's clarinet squealed like a startled puppy; she hadn't practiced in weeks." I should also note that there is some ambiguity regarding whether "she" refers to Mackenzie or the puppy ...
Jun
2
comment Does the term “garbledy gook” have racist origins?
@cornbreadninja Bafflegab is reminiscent of Balderdash, another of my favorites. "Cut the technical bafflegab; it's just balderdash, and you're not being paid by the word anyway."
Sep
2
comment Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
@Peter Shor yes, by all means, I have seen things other than asterisks as well. Good point.
Sep
1
comment Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
+1 @Thursagen I'm leaning toward Scene Break. Thanks for the blog link, very interesting stuff. I'll leave this up for a bit to see if anything else pops up.
Sep
1
awarded  Commentator
Sep
1
comment Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
Hah, it's really funny that you linked to a wikipedia page including LaTeX code, b/c my reason for asking this question in the first place was that I was in the middle of writing a business letter, and I wanted to find the LaTeX code for asterism or whatever it turns out to be called.
Sep
1
revised Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
added 107 characters in body; edited title
Sep
1
comment Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
@Monica: edited question to clarify object of my inquiry
Sep
1
awarded  Student
Sep
1
asked Is there a proper name for the 3 asterisks that are used to suggest temporal discontinuity?
Apr
3
revised How derogatory is “chicks” when used to refer to women?
clarifying answer
Apr
3
comment How derogatory is “chicks” when used to refer to women?
@Mitch. I like your point about the listener being the judge of whether something said is derogatory. That's how obscenity laws work, by the way -- "the community" decides on a standard. Imagine I were to say (without regard for truth) 1) "Mitch, you're a cunt" and 2) "Mitch, you're a chick" The first is obviously, unambiguously, derogatory, even if we're best friends. That's what I mean by intent being wholly irrelevant for words like _cunt_. But the second is permissible, to the extent that my intent does not aggravate some social rule.
Apr
3
comment What is a feminine version of 'guys'?
I said "discrimination implies intent," not "discrimination requires intent," but I'll let the Court draw the lines.
Apr
3
comment How derogatory is “chicks” when used to refer to women?
I fail to see how your example applies. Words like cunt and n***** are words that have but one meaning (connotation). Thus, while I agree that the intent of the person who utters those words is wholly irrelevant, regardless of whether she does so within the earshot of virgins, "chick" is a grayer word which positively abounds with meaning, and is thus generally permissible in planes, trains, and automobiles, subject of course (as I said originally) to the speaker's intent.
Apr
3
comment What is a feminine version of 'guys'?
@Tynam not sure what you mean by "unconscious discrimination." For example?