181 reputation
7
bio website
location Melbourne, Australia
age 29
visits member for 3 years
seen Dec 15 '13 at 11:04

Hi - how's it going?

My name's Chris, I'm a developer from Melbourne, Australia. I work for a large Australian retailer developing in-house software solutions.

I'm super passionate about all things coding, especially in the web development space.

My preferred languages include:

  • PHP
  • ActionScript 3
  • The HTML/JS/CSS stack
  • mySQL

Oct
6
comment Does an adjective apply to both nouns when joined with 'and'?
Ok. I'm going to play devil's advocate for a moment - what happens if I say "blue shirts and small socks", are the socks still blue? And if yes, what happens if I say "blue shirts and red socks"? The first adjective (small) doesn't negate the blue, so the socks would be small and blue? But the second adjective (red) does negate the blue adjective, so the socks are no longer blue? So the rule would be, the adjective attached to the first noun in a conjunction applies to the second noun, unless the second noun has an adjective that negates it?
Jan
10
comment Can an “s”-form plural follow an “s”-form possessive?
@Kris: Not to try to justify asking a question in the first place, but the amount of conversation this is generating shows, in my opionion, that there is merit in asking this question.
Jan
10
comment Can an “s”-form plural follow an “s”-form possessive?
@MattЭллен - This is my exact point. Maybe my example wasn't clear, but there is a distinct difference between electronic engineer, and electronics engineer. One is a robot, one is not. Although not as clear, there is a slight difference between a chemical shelf and a chemicals shelf
Jan
10
comment Can an “s”-form plural follow an “s”-form possessive?
@Kris: I'm not sure if my doubts are unfounded, when there seems to be a mix of answers, some indicating with the 's', some without.
Jun
8
comment Defining profit loss in laymans terms - without using loss in the explanation
Some really answers overall guys. But this is the most suitable to my needs
Jun
8
comment Defining profit loss in laymans terms - without using loss in the explanation
So 'unmade profit' is an acceptable phrase? To be honest, I'm not convinced that fault carries the right implications - I like it, and appreciate the answer, but not sold on it.
Apr
1
comment The word ‘dryly’ as an adverb
@Kosmonaut Yes I realised my mistake with the title after CesarGon mentioned it. I believe Jimi Oke was good enough to edit it
Mar
31
comment The word ‘dryly’ as an adverb
@CesarGon good pickup. Thanks.