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Nov
13
revised Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present?
added 16 characters in body
Nov
13
comment Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present?
@WS2 good point. I'll edit.
Nov
13
answered Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present?
Nov
12
comment A word for an intentional error or absurdity inserted to check whether audience read an entire passage
No, this is not what Easter Egg means. Easter Eggs are not hidden for the purpose of catching people who don't pay attention.
Nov
6
comment “An advantage given a handicapped person at the beginning of a competition to make them draw even”
I would call it apropos rather than ironic. One person is handicapped already so you give a handicap to the other person to make thinks equal.
Oct
27
answered Gentle word or phrase meaning ignorantly happy?
Oct
19
answered What do you call a job offer that isn't a real offer yet?
Oct
13
comment What is “a room a company provides for eating food” called?
@LightnessRacesinOrbit maybe in BE, but in AE it is the standard word
Oct
9
comment How to describe a person who has done well in every task except one, but he has done extremely bad in that 'one' task
He's an anti-one-hit-wonder?
Sep
29
answered Term to describe the movement in a group of maggots?
Sep
14
answered To what degree is 'muchly' obsolete?
Aug
26
comment Term for when someone interferes with another's authority?
What about undermine?
Aug
26
revised Term for when someone interferes with another's authority?
Added details to clarify request
Aug
26
comment Term for when someone interferes with another's authority?
I'm looking for something that has the connotation that Jim was wrong to do so. I will edit the question to clarify.
Aug
26
asked Term for when someone interferes with another's authority?
Aug
20
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
16
comment What is it called when someone uses your name to describe an act?
Verbing. Citation: gocomics.com/calvinandhobbes/2013/01/28 Edit: whoops, misread the question
Jul
8
comment English equivalent to Spanish idom “to discover America/the Mediterranean”
Similar is "to Columbus something" which means to act like you've discovered something even though it has already been discovered. This is primarily used when white people act like they have discovered something that was already prevalent in a minority culture.
Jul
8
comment Politer word to refer to a 'cleaner'
@AdrianRatnapala, janitor, at least in my experience, is almost exclusively cleaning. Someone who did things like repairs would be referred to as a handyman or maintenance man. Or, in corporate speak, maintenance staff or facilities manager.
Jul
7
comment Politer word to refer to a 'cleaner'
Yes. Cleaner is not used in AmE. At least not for that. Janitor would be the most common term. In AmE, "Cleaner" is used in movies to refer to a special-agent/criminal type character to comes in to clean-up botched jobs, a la Winston Wolf in Pulp Fiction or Victor in Point Of No Return (both played by Harvey Keitel)