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Apr
25
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
@T.E.D. Had a similar incident where a visiting British student got irritated with some boys who had teasingly taken her notebook and demanded that they give her back her "bloody pad"
Apr
25
comment Is it conceivable that President Obama might use the word “queue”?
It's not even about being a politician. Just about anybody who travels on a regular basis will use the local words for things, if they know them, when talking to people in that area.
Apr
19
answered Having done something so often, that it's all routine
Apr
15
awarded  Pundit
Apr
12
comment When you're angry at a situation but there is no action you can take
"impotent rage" is definitely what came to mind first. Followed quickly by a certain Smashing Pumpkins song
Apr
4
revised What do you call a minor flaw in a work that makes you realize how perfect/flawless it is otherwise?
Fixed grammar
Mar
31
awarded  Yearling
Mar
28
revised Idiom or Expression related to Nepotism
edited title for clarification
Mar
28
comment Idiom or Expression related to Nepotism
@JulieCarter I disagree. Asking two different things
Mar
21
revised Verb for pressing upper and lower lips together?
changed title to clarify question
Mar
16
comment Name for “having no concern about the truthfulness of one’s own remarks”
Maybe "Trumpness"?
Mar
7
comment What is the nuance of the phrase “have never not liked”?
@CGCampbell, I agree with Sven. In the context given here, it almost surely means that Mr Ebert liked every performance he had ever seen from Anne Hathaway.
Mar
7
comment What is the nuance of the phrase “have never not liked”?
" It allows, but does not require, that the subject was liked." I disagree. It absolutely requires that the subject was liked.
Feb
26
comment Is there an idiom to express “You couldn't get anything better”?
Do they still say that? I thought that went out of style about 70 or 80 years ago
Feb
24
comment Has “hacker” definitely gained a negative connotation?
@recognizer I'm familiar with it as a website, although I'd forgotten about when I wrote my previous comment. I've just never heard or seen it used in conversation to describe a person the way hacker is used.
Feb
24
comment Has “hacker” definitely gained a negative connotation?
You're talking about a completely different word, not to mention using anecdotal evidence to support your position. While you say you've heard "life-hacker" way more often than "hacker", I don't know that I've ever heard that particular form of the word. Lifehack and lifehacking? Yes. Lifehacker? No. Regardless of whether your claim about frequency is correct, talking about lifehackers when the question is about computer hackers is kind of like talking about lifeguards when someone asks a question about guards in the NFL.
Feb
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
23
answered What is the correct term for 'misleading' investigations?
Feb
20
answered What is the term describing the condition of being oversaturated with information?
Feb
5
comment Term for: Simultaneous rare experience/occurrence
This doesn't exactly match, but there is a term for when you learn about some obscure piece of information for the first time, then very shortly hear about it again. It's called the "Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon".