118 reputation
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location Cambridge, United Kingdom
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visits member for 6 months
seen Jul 22 at 12:30

Jul
7
awarded  Scholar
Jul
7
accepted A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
Jul
7
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
+ Answer. No-one has provided better, and it exactly meets the criteria. Many thanks.
Jul
6
awarded  Commentator
Jul
6
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
@ermanen handbook or reference is in the right direction. The challenge here is a name that is free of preconceptions; Software handbook has too many already.
Jul
6
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
Oh, I do like cook book. Your reasoning is spot on.
Jul
4
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
@ElendilTheTall Taster is in the right direction, thanks, though it implies (to me) a more try-before-you-buy scenario than one of looking up how I should do 'X'.
Jul
4
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
These are good candidates, thanks +1. That I effectively have a 'primer' section to the User Manual already is something I could work around. Cheat sheet is rather more the function of the item - a set of small reference items to copy from, but primer sounds more professional.
Jul
4
revised A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
Add 2nd clarifier as responses are 'off target' so far
Jul
4
awarded  Student
Jul
4
awarded  Editor
Jul
4
revised A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
Added note not to provide a plural word.
Jul
4
comment A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
@JLG Thanks but no. It's a plural and I'm specifically looking for a singular name for the collection-of-samples. Think more along the lines of anthology, digest, etc. (which have already been rejected here.)
Jul
4
asked A word for 'sampler' suitable for international readers
Mar
12
comment What's the English equivalent of “Drilling one's head”?
I'd largely concur with @Grhm. It's a phrase I've heard and used occasionally in the UK, more so in my youth (1960's, 70's). The connotation is usually a "telling off" and may in some way be related to pulling someone forcibly to one side by grabbing their ear prior to giving the telling off. I's say it's more typically a one-off event than a "banging on" that the OP was after.
Mar
6
awarded  Supporter
Mar
6
comment What is the term describing someone who has interest in only a narrow field, and nothing else?
SME doesn't have the connotation of "and ... not interested in anything else".
Mar
2
answered Do you hang up a cellphone?
Mar
2
comment Do you hang up a cellphone?
Between the second and third cycles of 'over 21' :-) So my first experience of telephony was the bakelite, rotary-dial, fixed wire, sitting-at-the-bottom-of-the-stairs (because the phone is in the hallway) experience.
Mar
2
awarded  Teacher