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seen May 11 '11 at 23:00

May
11
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
I've never heard REVV-uck-able. I have heard an attorney discuss a reVOCable trust. (US)
May
11
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
@JPmiaou: just think godDAMmit, Willamette.
May
11
comment Did English ever have a formal version of “you”?
Interesting to note we typically address God in the familiar form, not the formal.
May
11
comment What mnemonics help solve common linguistic issues?
When I took German, I'd sing "aus ausser bei mit, nach seit, von zu" to the Blue Danube tune, and "an auf hinter in vor neben ueber unter zwischen" to the Ode to Joy. YMMV
Sep
28
comment Will grammar errors become correct after enough people use them for enough time?
@Emtucifor: My point is simply that if you're going to clutch your pearls this tight and go all " O tempora o mores! " on us, it's more convincing if you yourself don't exemplify the decline of standards you are bemoaning. If you don't hold yourself to a standard of perfection, then what could possibly be the point of your question?
Sep
26
comment I can run faster than _____. (1) him (2) he?
@Emtucifor: I think the traditional view is that "he" is correct, because "I am faster than he is fast."
Sep
26
comment Will grammar errors become correct after enough people use them for enough time?
Very similar to english.stackexchange.com/questions/2773/…
Sep
26
comment Will grammar errors become correct after enough people use them for enough time?
Some people don't even set foreign expressions like fait accompli in italics!
Sep
26
comment How do you handle “that that”? The double “that” problem
Had had had the same issue.
Sep
21
comment How would you abbreviate surnames starting with Mc/O/D?
Yeah, but you know that Rossum guy that invented Python? Or Susteren herself? These sound off to me.
Sep
21
comment What is the meaning of “to look like a square”?
AKA "stick in the mud," a person who is no fun.
Sep
21
comment How would one use the word preposition?
Judging from the answer you've accepted, you're more interested in prepositions than in the term itself.
Sep
21
comment How should this sentence be punctuated?
I think you mean punctuation, not formatting.
Sep
20
comment Do contractions (e.g. “don't”) and full phrases (e.g. “do not”) have the same meaning?
@nohat: awkwardness is in the ear of the beholder. Why can I not do that? It only sounds awkward because it's so seldom used.
Sep
20
comment Is it correct to say “What was your name?”?
The past tense carries over from the more wordy "What did you say your name was?"
Sep
19
comment Is “might could” a correct construct?
Another very useful double modal: might oughta, as in, "You might oughta do that."
Sep
18
comment Regarding Re: ; what is the correct usage in an email subject line?
Ordinarily, I'd have no objection to Re: meaning "in regard to", but if you're starting a new thread, what's the difference between "Unicorns" and "Re: Unicorns"? Very little, so I'd say leave it off. The only exception would be if you were continuing a discussion started elsewhere, say, at a staff meeting, or in the "Unicorns and Maseratis" thread, then this would indicate reference to what has gone before.
Sep
18
comment How does one pronounce the '@' symbol?
Since "Aw please" is not much of an explanation, I'll just point out that @ has meaning within a string representing an email address, but no independent function in the sentence. I have seen it as a sort of shorthand on invoices, like so: Your order #3475638, consisting of 560 bagels @ $3.59 per dozen, shipped on Tuesday. Please remit $167.53.
Sep
18
comment What’s purportedly wrong with Strunk & White’s “The Elements of Style”?
Thanks for saving me from reading Pullum.
Sep
18
comment Can we say “Had Einstein used his spare time on something more useful for the society, …”
Assuming it's me you'd like to elaborate, the past conditional would go like this: If I knew that information when I finished school, I've forgotten it now. (Maybe I knew it, maybe I didn't.) Contrast with a typical contrary to fact conditional: If I had known you were coming, I would have hidden the vodka. (The point is that I didn't know you were coming.) It could also be phrased, "Had I known..." It looks like a past perfect, but is actually past tense subjunctive mood.