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  • 22 votes cast
Sep
3
comment Explanation for “emails”?
@Boofus: eletters, obviously!
Sep
3
comment Which is correct: coming down the “pike” or “pipe”?
In case anyone's wondering how "pike", meaning a long-poled weapon, came to refer to a big road, it's shortened from "turnpike," metonymy for a toll road, where entry was regulated by means of a long pole that was turned after payment to allow traffic onto the road.
Sep
3
answered What is an appropriate response to “what's up” greeting?
Sep
3
answered What does “unimpressed” mean in this sentence?
Sep
3
comment “Unless someone lives under a rock”
@Steve: I think it is relevant. In a formal setting you might say "Unless you're living under a rock, you may have heard of Paris Hilton." In this case, it's not rude; someone who doesn't follow pop culture may have been so fortunate without being an idiot.
Sep
3
answered Can “have a feeling that” be used to state a fact?
Sep
3
comment What are some examples of awkward sounding but grammatically correct sentences?
If you're going to attribute it to Churchill, please get the quotation right.
Sep
1
comment Which preposition should be used after the verb “request”?
I agree with Shinto: "to refrain" should be simply "refrain" in the sentence above.
Sep
1
answered Does the verb “unpublish” exist?
Sep
1
answered Mass nouns and counts nouns. Does getting it wrong ever matter?
Sep
1
answered What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
Sep
1
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
US: cuh-ROT-tid. Cuh-RAW-tid sounds British to me.
Sep
1
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
M-W clearly pronounces it IN-ven-tor-y, with secondary stress on tor. Just like me.
Sep
1
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
common English pattern: stress goes on the antepenultimate syllable
Sep
1
answered Requested ship date
Sep
1
comment Are double negatives proper English (e.g. “I don't know nothing”)?
Don't NEVER say you can't use double negation for emphasis!
Sep
1
comment Are double negatives proper English (e.g. “I don't know nothing”)?
This construction calls to mind Prissy's line from GWTW: Lawzy, we got to have a doctor. I don't know nothin' 'bout birthin' babies.
Sep
1
answered Use of “myself” in business-speak
Sep
1
answered In which context does “anticipated” mean “came or took place before”?
Sep
1
comment In which context does “anticipated” mean “came or took place before”?
No, this is the meaning to expect or await.