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seen May 11 '11 at 23:00

Sep
14
comment How to pronounce “beach” and “bitch”? What's the difference?
Part of the difficulty may be that you are pronouncing other short i sounds as ee, so your friends grow accustomed to that as your pronunciation. Then in their ears, your ee sound in beach gets translated to a short i even though in this case you pronounced it correctly.
Sep
14
comment Can we say “Had Einstein used his spare time on something more useful for the society, …”
For what it's worth, this is the contrary to fact usage of the not-quite-dead-yet subjunctive.
Sep
14
comment Word to describe “fleeting, wandering and prone to drifting off” of thought
"Break down," meaning to analyze, is two words. A breakdown refers to a failure of some kind: mechanical, communication, etc.
Sep
14
comment What is a good way to refer to stories that are meant for adults?
Once, at a Discovery Zone-type store, I asked a saleswoman if they had puzzles and things not for kids. She yelled across the store to her coworker, "Hey, Linda! Show this guy the adult toys." We all had a chuckle then.
Sep
9
comment How dangerous is the acceptance of common usage on traditional English?
Vote to close as subjective, contentious, and generally impertinent.
Sep
8
comment Should I reformat this sentence?
How about "track record you seek"?
Sep
4
comment When is it correct to capitalise 'earth'?
@Neil: "a hole in the earth" conforms to my proposed rule. And anyway, to me a hole in the earth is a hole in the ground, not a hole in the planet. But I'd still say the asteroid bored a hole clean through the earth.
Sep
4
comment In which context does “anticipated” mean “came or took place before”?
To me this is not the same as "take place before." More like "hasten."
Sep
4
awarded  Editor
Sep
4
revised What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
added 1 characters in body
Sep
4
comment What words are commonly mispronounced by literate people who read them before they heard them?
La-FAY-ette, AL
Sep
4
comment What does “from hunger” mean?
Anyone else amused by "very mediocre"? As opposed to just a little bit mediocre, perhaps.
Sep
4
comment What does “from hunger” mean?
doesn't apply to this context
Sep
4
comment Is “laid down” a proper term?
I believe it's the keel that is laid down as the starting point for shipbuilding.
Sep
4
answered What does “graduate applicant” mean?
Sep
3
comment Explanation for “emails”?
@Boofus: eletters, obviously!
Sep
3
comment Which is correct: coming down the “pike” or “pipe”?
In case anyone's wondering how "pike", meaning a long-poled weapon, came to refer to a big road, it's shortened from "turnpike," metonymy for a toll road, where entry was regulated by means of a long pole that was turned after payment to allow traffic onto the road.
Sep
3
answered What is an appropriate response to “what's up” greeting?
Sep
3
answered What does “unimpressed” mean in this sentence?
Sep
3
comment “Unless someone lives under a rock”
@Steve: I think it is relevant. In a formal setting you might say "Unless you're living under a rock, you may have heard of Paris Hilton." In this case, it's not rude; someone who doesn't follow pop culture may have been so fortunate without being an idiot.