Reputation
3,077
Top tag
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
8 11
Newest
 Nice Answer
Impact
~422k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 22 votes cast
Sep
19
comment Is “might could” a correct construct?
Another very useful double modal: might oughta, as in, "You might oughta do that."
Sep
18
comment Regarding Re: ; what is the correct usage in an email subject line?
Ordinarily, I'd have no objection to Re: meaning "in regard to", but if you're starting a new thread, what's the difference between "Unicorns" and "Re: Unicorns"? Very little, so I'd say leave it off. The only exception would be if you were continuing a discussion started elsewhere, say, at a staff meeting, or in the "Unicorns and Maseratis" thread, then this would indicate reference to what has gone before.
Sep
18
comment How does one pronounce the '@' symbol?
Since "Aw please" is not much of an explanation, I'll just point out that @ has meaning within a string representing an email address, but no independent function in the sentence. I have seen it as a sort of shorthand on invoices, like so: Your order #3475638, consisting of 560 bagels @ $3.59 per dozen, shipped on Tuesday. Please remit $167.53.
Sep
18
comment What’s purportedly wrong with Strunk & White’s “The Elements of Style”?
Thanks for saving me from reading Pullum.
Sep
18
answered Response to “God Bless” when parting company
Sep
18
answered How do native English speakers respond to “Thank you”?
Sep
18
comment Can we say “Had Einstein used his spare time on something more useful for the society, …”
Assuming it's me you'd like to elaborate, the past conditional would go like this: If I knew that information when I finished school, I've forgotten it now. (Maybe I knew it, maybe I didn't.) Contrast with a typical contrary to fact conditional: If I had known you were coming, I would have hidden the vodka. (The point is that I didn't know you were coming.) It could also be phrased, "Had I known..." It looks like a past perfect, but is actually past tense subjunctive mood.
Sep
18
answered How dangerous is the acceptance of common usage on traditional English?
Sep
18
answered Starting an independent statement with “I mean, …”
Sep
18
revised Word for when people store scarce resources to increase demand and sell at higher price
added 23 characters in body
Sep
18
answered Why is it “your Majesty”, but “my Lord”?
Sep
18
comment What does “What are you up to?” mean?
Can also mean "What's your scheme?" as when the boss comes in after hours to find you hauling cement bags into the office.
Sep
18
answered Inverse of “being a fan of”?
Sep
18
comment Do “normal people” know the terms URL and GUI?
@Midhat: the closest definition I see on a cursory search is from Wiktionary: "(computing) The connection between a user and a machine. [Example] The options are selected via the user interface." I have a hard time believing a foreigner who doesn't speak English will get the notion of buttons and text fields, etc. from this verbiage.
Sep
18
comment What are some uncommon but valid portmanteau words that people use?
Don't forget rockumentary, coined in 1969. And how about prequel and threepeat?
Sep
18
comment They might keep knowledge of its potential to effect social change from being widely disseminated
Note the use of the verb meaning of "effect": to bring about.
Sep
18
comment Word for when people store scarce resources to increase demand and sell at higher price
@mickeyf: How about Merriam-Webster? "[n.] control or ownership of enough of the available supply of a commodity or security especially to permit manipulation of the price " followed by "[v.] to get a corner on <corner the market>" What's your source?
Sep
17
answered When did “y’all” become improper?
Sep
17
answered Word for when people store scarce resources to increase demand and sell at higher price
Sep
17
comment Which is right, “bananas and apples” or “apples and bananas” or both?
Where do I -1 for the teach?