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Mar
7
comment What do you call someone who studies calendars?
Certainly it does. To quote the OP "I am looking for the word you would call someone who knows how to calculate the number of days between a date in the distant past" and my point is that any number of types of people would fit that bill and any scholar of calendars while certainly capable of performing the task would, I think, but overqualified. Like having a Nobel economist doing your taxes.
Mar
6
comment Is “all that he have” correct?
All the things that he halves will be given to her.:)
Mar
6
comment Quoting poor English in a news article? I don't often see “[sic]”
I think it depends on the quality of the mistake. If including it serves to elucidate something about the source or the relevance of the information, then by all means leave it in. For example if the misuse or at least the colloquial use of the language is integral to the character of the speaker (a child, for instance).
Mar
6
comment How do I improve on this question from the suggestion given?
Is there a philosophy stackexchange yet?
Mar
6
answered What do you call someone who studies calendars?
Mar
4
comment If conditional “didn't” vs “hadn't”
I guess I was think colloquially, but it brings up an interesting question about the use of come and go and their usage in temporal and spatial locations. I feel a question brewing.
Mar
4
comment Word related to hosting
The state of being like a hospital.
Mar
4
comment “These include” or “This includes”
What's the sentence that comes before? That would indicate these or this.
Mar
4
answered How should I understand “the one lab bench”?
Mar
4
comment What is meant by the “benefit of the doubt”?
Evenly balanced or entirely absent.
Mar
4
comment tailored to someone needs VS tailor-made
@Hellion, you hit it with altered.
Mar
4
answered A word for “to claim a position or place above something or someone else”
Mar
4
comment A word for “to claim a position or place above something or someone else”
A boat displaces water.
Mar
4
comment Word for 'so simple you'd think it's obvious but it's not'
This question reminds of the bit about the cat flap from Dirk Gently.
Mar
4
comment Word for 'so simple you'd think it's obvious but it's not'
Seems similar to this question. There might be some useful answers.
Mar
4
answered If conditional “didn't” vs “hadn't”
Mar
4
comment What's the phrase for things that get better with age?
I think you're examples are unclear as there might be some difference of opinion (in both examples) as to which one is better.
Mar
4
answered What's the phrase for things that get better with age?
Feb
26
accepted Can you be literal about non-literal things?
Feb
26
comment Why there is “the” before some names but not others
@PeterShor It might be The Brooklyn Bridge, but aren't there technically three Brooklyn bridges? Williamsburg and Manhattan?