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11021
bio website sambaker.net
location United States
age
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Oct 23 at 15:02

Oct
10
comment Is the “overseas” bushism really so absurd?
Since the origin of the word overseas is British, where all foreign countries are literally, overseas, one could argue that the figurative meaning could be seen as all foreign countries, regardless of actual maritime impediments.
Jul
11
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
29
awarded  Yearling
Mar
22
asked Is a scheme always negative in the US?
Mar
7
comment A feeling of there is “something more to it”
Foreshadowing as a narrative device serves to hint at the future events, and if done well leaves the reader/viewer with a vague sense of impending action, or if done badly it leaves them saying, "oh he just coughed, he's going to die", or "the railing is loose, it's probably going to fail at just the wrong moment later on."
Mar
7
comment What is the correct way of saying: press a button multiple times, but don't hold it down for too long?
It's the 1-2 words that's causing the trouble. Is the restriction because this needs to fit on a label or something? For a manual, I would choose clarity over brevity. Can you tell us what the button actually does?
Mar
7
comment What is the correct way of saying: press a button multiple times, but don't hold it down for too long?
Is this for computer software? In which case clicking is readily understood."keep clicking until..." If it's not, clicking might be confusing.
Mar
7
comment What is the meaning of “a roach in the rushes”?
sounds like "fly on the wall" could easily be substituted.
Mar
7
comment What was the idiom for multitasking before chewing gum was invented?
couple things. Having your fingers in "many" pies is a much more common expression than "too many". Kill two birds, refers to a specific efficient act, not the person performing it.
Mar
7
revised What was the idiom for multitasking before chewing gum was invented?
edited body
Mar
7
answered What was the idiom for multitasking before chewing gum was invented?
Mar
7
comment Idiomatic expression for a difficult choice
@Bidella, but each choice is equally undesirable. Choosing either one means accepting the undesirable condition you mentioned, and also forgoing the other option (obviously undesirable).
Mar
7
comment What do you call someone who studies calendars?
Certainly it does. To quote the OP "I am looking for the word you would call someone who knows how to calculate the number of days between a date in the distant past" and my point is that any number of types of people would fit that bill and any scholar of calendars while certainly capable of performing the task would, I think, but overqualified. Like having a Nobel economist doing your taxes.
Mar
6
comment Is “all that he have” correct?
All the things that he halves will be given to her.:)
Mar
6
comment Quoting poor English in a news article? I don't often see “[sic]”
I think it depends on the quality of the mistake. If including it serves to elucidate something about the source or the relevance of the information, then by all means leave it in. For example if the misuse or at least the colloquial use of the language is integral to the character of the speaker (a child, for instance).
Mar
6
comment How do I improve on this question from the suggestion given?
Is there a philosophy stackexchange yet?
Mar
6
answered What do you call someone who studies calendars?
Mar
4
comment If conditional “didn't” vs “hadn't”
I guess I was think colloquially, but it brings up an interesting question about the use of come and go and their usage in temporal and spatial locations. I feel a question brewing.
Mar
4
comment Word related to hosting
The state of being like a hospital.