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Aug
23
comment Is there a symbol for “and/or”?
@SarahofGaia The Wikipedia article suggests it's an underlined logical OR.
Aug
14
comment A word meaning a choice made for self advantage
I doubt it's the word you seek (thus a comment and not an answer), but just in case: corrupt? Or conniving?
Aug
14
comment Should Kelvin symbol have a preceding space?
To be more specific, this quote is from Wikipedia which refers to "the SI brochure" (from the International Bureau of Weights and Measures) and "the NIST brochure" (The National Institute of Standards and Technology), in the footnotes.
Jul
27
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
21
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
26
awarded  Yearling
Feb
9
comment What part of speech are non-human “interjections” like “oink” and “bang”?
I guess I mean "makes a noise like a pig", but specifically in the case where it's rendered as "oink" in a sentence. Say you were tasked with tagging each word/token with its part of speech in the example sentence of my question. What part of speech would you choose for the word "oink" in that sentence?
Dec
13
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
11
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
6
comment Commas around non-parenthetical name like “The famous playwright, William Shakespeare, was born…”?
I just read White's revised version of "The Elements of Style" and noticed this bit: "titles that follow a name are parenthetic and should be punctuated accordingly." with examples like "Horace Fulsome, Ph.D., presided." It goes on to say: "No comma, however, should separate a noun from a restrictive term of identification.", with examples including "The poet Sappho". Thus the commas in "The famous playwright, William Shakespeare, was born …" seem to violate that source.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
11
comment Hypernym for “film” and “TV series”
Does it refer to 1. the abstract thing (the movie or show "themselves") or 2. a broadcast of one of those things or 3. the physical thing (a movie DVD or TV series box, say)? I would assume it's option 1?
Apr
3
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
26
awarded  Yearling
Jan
18
answered Phrase for correcting text in a particular manner
Jan
18
revised Term for words like Snowmageddon, Nipplegate and even cheeseburger?
deleted 22 characters in body
Jan
18
answered Term for words like Snowmageddon, Nipplegate and even cheeseburger?
Oct
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
9
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
26
awarded  Yearling